Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
VA Staat Vatikanstadt, Estado de la Ciudad del Vaticano, État de la Cité du Vatican, Stato della Città del Vaticano, State of the Vatican City
Ornithologie (Vogelkunde), Ornitología, Ornithologie, Ornitologia, Ornithology

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Erithacus rubecula (W3)

Der engl. "Robin Redbreast" heißt dt. "Rotkehlchen". Dabei handelt es sich um den zool.-lat. "Erithacus rubecula". Das Adjektiv lat. "ruber", "rubra", "rubrum" = dt. "rot", "rot gefärbt", "gerötet" findet man auch in lat. "mare rubrum" = dt. "das Rote Meer" ("Persischer Golf", "Indischer Ozean").

Die Beschreibung für den "Erithacus rubecula" lautet "oberseits olivbrauner Singvogel mit rostroter Kehle, Stirn und Vorderbrust sowie mit weißlicher Unterseite". Ursprünglich umfasste die Farbbezeichnung rot einen großen Farbbereich. Als dann im 16. Jh. die Farbbezeichnung "orange" mit der "Orange" aus dem Sanskrit oder Tamil über arab. "naranj" und engl. "a naranj", "an aranj", "an orange" nach Europa kam beließ man es dennoch beim dt. "Rotkehlchen" bzw. engl. "Robin Redbreast". Dt. "Orangekehlchen" bzw. "Robin Orangebreast" wäre auch nicht so handlich.

Zum Artnamen "Erithacus" ist lediglich zu erfahren, dass er aus dem Altgriechischen stammt und ursprünglich einen heute unbekannten Vogel bezeichnete.

(E?)(L?) http://www.afblum.be/bioafb/index.htm

Rougegorge familier Erithacus rubecula (Linnaeus, 1758)

Rougegorge familier Erithacus rubecula, Turdidae, Passeriformes, Oiseaux (Hamois, Condroz, Province de Namur, Belgique - 15/11/1997 - Diapositive originale réalisée par Eric Walravens).

Rougegorge familier Erithacus rubecula, Turdidae, Passeriformes, Oiseaux (Lac du Der, Département de la Marne, Région de Champagne-Ardenne, France- 22/11/2008 - Photographie originale réalisée par Eric Walravens).

Rougegorge familier Erithacus rubecula, Turdidae, Passeriformes, Oiseaux (Hamois, Condroz, Province de Namur, Belgique - 23/11/2008 - Photographie originale réalisée par Eric Walravens).


(E?)(L?) https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/107540#page/225/mode/1up

I. Gattung: Erdsänger, Erithacus - Cuvier


(E?)(L?) https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/107540#page/244/mode/1up

Rotkehlchen - Robin - Erithacus rubecula


(E?)(L?) https://www.eslpublishing.com/seeing-red-by-grammar-diva-arlene-miller/

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In Europe we have a bird, the "European Robin", "Erithacus rubecula". "Robin Redbreast" — usually depicted standing on a snow-covered log—adorns Christmas cards across the globe, even in countries that have never seen a living example of the creature.

Ask anybody, from the tiniest tot to a grown adult, to draw one or colour in an outline, and the first colour they will reach for is scarlet. Everybody knows the colour.

So red are the chest feathers of this bird that there are folk stories from across Europe telling how this colour arose, mainly involving the blood of Christ during the crucifixion.

When the Victorians introduced the world’s first national postal delivery system, the delivery boys’ uniforms included a crimson waistcoat and they were immediately nicknamed “Robins.”

In Latin "rubecula" indicates "red".

But there is a problem because the breast of the "European Robin" is not red — it’s orange! Even people who see these birds on an almost-daily basis will insist this statement is incorrect, and the breast is red. Shown a photograph as proof, they may suggest there was something wrong with the development process, or the film, or the camera … anything except that they might have been misled, or have misled themselves, all these years. Okay, have you just Googled "European Robin"? Were you surprised that I am right? Proof of the power of words.

So how did this strange situation come about?

The problem is that the bird has existed alongside man for tens of thousands of years, but the word "orange" didn’t enter the English language until the sixteenth century. Until then there was "red" and variations of "red". The nearest the language had to "orange" was "yellow-red" (geoluread—geh-olloo-reh-ahd—in Old English). But "Robin Geoluread-Breost" doesn’t have much of a ring to it, does it?

The word "orange" probably originated as the name of the fruit in Sanskrit or Tamil, arriving in Europe via the Arabic "naranj" (they’re all very similar to modern Spanish’s "naranja"). When the Europeans acquired the "yellow-red" fruit, they started using the name to describe the colour.

But wait a minute. How did "naranj" morph into "orange"? By a process called "rebracketing" or "wrong word division", and it’s easy to see how "a naranj" became "an aranj" and finally "an orange". This process was also seen when, for example, "a napron" became "an apron", or in reverse when "an eke name" (literally an "also name") became "a nickname".

But "orange" presented another difficulty to the English language in that it is one of the few words for which there is not a perfect rhyme. But on that score I think we might also have struggled with geoluread too.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.naturfoto-cz.de/motivsuche/?retezec_search=Erithacus+rubecula&hledat.x=9&hledat.y=10

Rotkehlchen - Erithacus rubecula


(E?)(L?) http://tierdoku.com/index.php?title=Rotkehlchen

Das "Rotkehlchen" ("Erithacus rubecula"), auch unter den Synonymen "Dandalus rubecula", "Lusciola rubecula", "Motacilla rubecula" und "Sylvia rubecula" sowie unter den Bezeichnungen "Rotbrüstchen", "Kehlröschen", "Waldröschen", "Winterröschen" oder "Rotkröpfchen" bekannt, zählt innerhalb der Familie der Fliegenschnäpper (Muscicapidae) zur Gattung "Erithacus". Im Englischen wird das "Rotkehlchen" "european robin" oder nur "robin" genannt.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.kruenitz1.uni-trier.de/cgi-bin/callKruenitz.tcl

Erithacus, siehe "Rothkehlchen"

"Rothkehlchen", "Rothkelgen", "Rothbrüstchen", "Waldröthlein", "Rothkröpfchen", "Rothkehlein", "Rothbart", Lat. "Rubecula". "Motacilla (Rubecula) grisea", "gula pectoreque ferrugineis Linn." Syst, Nat XII. p 337, n. 45. "Motacilla grisea". gula pectoreque fulvis Fauna Suec. n. 206. Erithacus sive Rubecula Aldrov. Av. Tom. III, p. 741. willughby Ornithol. p. 160. Erithacus Aristoteli. Rubecula gàzae. Gesn. lcon Avi p. 48. Sylvia sylvatica. Klein Avi. 77 n. I. Ficedula fulva, pectore rubro, Barerre Ornithol. Class. II. Gen. 18. Sp. 4. Griech. "???"; Ital. "Pettirosso", "Pettusso", "Pechietto"; Portug. "Pitiroxo"; Catalon. "Pita-roiti"; Schwed. "Rot-gel"; Engl. "Red-breast", "Robinredbreast", "Ruddock"; Franz. "Rouge-gorge", "Rouge-bourse", "Gorge-rouge", "Rubeline", "Godrille" und in verschiedenen Departements Frankreichs "Roupie", "Rubiette", "Rubienne", "Jaunar", "Russe", "Bosote", "Berée", "Ruche", "Frilleuse" etc.; Holl. "Rotborste"; Poln. "Gil Illyr-czier-wenka", "zer-wenka".
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(E?)(L?) https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotkehlchen

Das Rotkehlchen (Erithacus rubecula) ist eine Vogelart aus der Familie der Fliegenschnäpper (Muscicapidae). Es besiedelt Nordafrika, Europa und Kleinasien sowie die Mittelmeerinseln. Seine Nahrung besteht vor allem aus Insekten, kleinen Spinnen, Würmern und Schnecken. Sein Gesang beginnt etwa eine Stunde vor Sonnenaufgang und ist bis in die Dämmerung fast das ganze Jahr über zu hören. Die Art gilt derzeit als ungefährdet.
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(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_robin

The "European robin" ("Erithacus rubecula"), known simply as the "robin" or "robin redbreast" in the British Isles, is a small insectivorous passerine bird that belongs to the chat subfamily of the Old World flycatcher family. About 12.5–14.0 cm (5.0–5.5 inches) in length, the male and female are similar in colouration, with an "orange breast" and face lined with grey, brown upper-parts and a whitish belly. It is found across Europe, east to Western Siberia and south to North Africa; it is sedentary in most of its range except the far north.

The term "robin" is also applied to some birds in other families with red or orange breasts. These include the "American robin" ("Turdus migratorius"), a thrush, and the "Australasian robins" of the family Petroicidae, the relationships of which are unclear.

Name, taxonomy and systematics

The "European robin" was described by Carl Linnaeus in 1758 in the 10th edition of his Systema Naturae under the binomial name "Motacilla rubecula". Its specific epithet "rubecula" is a diminutive derived from the Latin "ruber" = "red". The genus "Erithacus" was introduced by French naturalist Georges Cuvier in 1800, giving the bird its current binomial name "E. rubecula". The genus name "Erithacus" is from Ancient Greek and refers to an unknown bird, now usually identified as "robin".

The distinctive orange breast of both sexes contributed to the "European robin"'s original name of "redbreast", "orange" as a colour name being unknown in English until the 16th century, by which time the fruit had been introduced. In the 15th century, when it became popular to give human names to familiar species, the bird came to be known as "robin redbreast", which was eventually shortened to "robin". As a given name, "Robin" is originally a diminutive of "Robert". Other older English names for the bird include "ruddock" and "robinet". In American literature of the late 19th century, this "robin" was frequently called the "English robin". Dutch "roodborstje", French "rouge-gorge", German "Rotkehlchen", Italian "pettirosso", Spanish "petirrojo" and Portuguese "pisco-de-peito-ruivo" all refer to the distinctively coloured front.

The genus "Erithacus" previously included the "Japanese robin" and the "Ryukyu robin". These east Asian species were shown in molecular phylogenetic studies to be more similar to a group of other Asian species than to the "European robin". In a reorganisation of the genera, the "Japanese robins" and the "Ryukyu robins" were moved to the resurrected genus "Larvivora" leaving the "European robin" as the sole member of "Erithacus". The phylogenetic analysis placed "Erithacus" in the subfamily "Erithacinae", which otherwise contained only African species, but its exact position with respect to the other genera was not resolved.

The genus "Erithacus" was formerly classified as a member of the thrush family ("Turdidae") but is now considered to belong to the Old World flycatcher family ("Muscicapidae"), specifically to the chats (subfamily "Saxicolinae") which also include the common nightingale.
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Erstellt: 2020-12

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Puffinus (W3)

Die Bezeichnung "Puffinus" für "Sturmtaucher" wird von Adelung auf die Lautäußerungen zurück geführt, also lautmalerisch erklärt. Auf der englischen Wikipedia-Seite wird auf den gepökelten Nestling (das noch nicht flugfähige Jungtier) verwiesen, der früher als Delikatesse galt.

"Puffinus puffinus": small black-and-white shearwater common in the northeastern Atlantic



Bei Adelung ist zu finden:


Die "Erdmewe", plur. die -n, eine Art Mewen, welche sich in den nördlichen Gegenden aufhält, die Größe einer Änte und rothe Füße hat, und sich gern unter der Erde in den Höhlen der Kaninchen aufhält; "Puffinus, L.", "Larus piger, Kl.", Engl. "Puffin", Deutsch auch "Pupin", welchen Nahmen sie von ihrer Stimme hat.


(E?)(L?) https://www.anagrams.net/puffinus

This page list all the various possible anagrams for the word "puffinus".


(E?)(L?) http://www.avesdechile.cl/

Indice por Nombres Científicos


(E?)(L?) http://www.avesdechile.cl/

Indice por Orden Taxonómico

PROCELLARIIDAE


(E?)(L?) http://www.avesdechile.cl/

Registros y otros


(E?)(L?) https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/search?searchTerm=Puffinus&stype=F#/titles




(E?)(L?) https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/search?searchTerm=Puffinus&stype=F#/names




(E?)(L2) https://www.britannica.com/animal/Puffinus

... the genus "Puffinus", which has approximately 20 species. ...


(E?)(L?) https://avibase.bsc-eoc.org/search.jsp?qstr=Puffinus




(E?)(L?) http://www.curioustaxonomy.net/etym/misnamed.html

"Puffinus puffinus" ("Manx shearwater") Not the puffin. It was described from a chick by a scientist who thought it was a puffin.


(E?)(L?) http://www.curioustaxonomy.net/word/tautonymlist.html

Puffinus puffinus (Brunnich, 1764) (Manx shearwater)


(E?)(L?) https://www.definitions.net/definition/puffinus

"Puffinus" is a genus of seabirds in the order Procellariiformes It comprises about 20 small to medium-sized shearwaters Two other shearwater genera are named: Calonectris which comprises three large shearwaters and Procellaria with another four large species The latter are usually called 'petrels' although they are thought to be more closely related to the shearwaters than to the other petrels. Despite the resemblance in the name, the puffins are auks and completely unrelated to the shearwaters in the genus Puffinus; the genus name "Puffinus" is actually a New Latin loanword based on the English "puffin". The original Latin term for shearwaters was usually the catchall name for sea-birds, "mergus". The taxonomy of this group is the cause of much debate, and the number of recognised species depends on the source.
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(E?)(L?) https://www.definitions.net/definition/puffinus+puffinus

"Manx shearwater", "Puffinus puffinus" (noun) - small black-and-white shearwater common in the northeastern Atlantic


(E?)(L?) http://www.faunistik.net/BSWT/_CLASSIC/NAUMANN/_main/naumann.html




(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/australia.html

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What is a Mutton-bird?

"Mutton-bird, any of various species of seabirds, especially shearwaters ("puffinus griseus", "P. tenuirostris"), of the southern oceans, whose flesh is thought to taste something like mutton. Such birds were popular food of the Maori in New Zealand, who used to pot them in their own fat, thus making a sort of antipoedean confit. In the Seychelles, 'salted wedged-tail shearwaters' used to figure in certain traditional dishes, no longer made because the birds now have a measure of protection. Even now, mutton-birds are locally eaten in Tasmania where ready-roasted birds are marketed during the season."

Oxford Companion to Food, Alan Davidson [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 2nd edition, 2007 (p. 529)
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"Mutton Bird or Shearwater ("Puffinus griseus")

A petrel of the south seas which lives and breeds on the islands south of New Zealand. They are extremely numerous, and when very young are thought a great delicacy in Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand. The day after being killed they are split open, the wings, head and legs having been cut off, and dry salt is rubbed over them. They are preserved in casks like kippers. In the 1930s they were introduced in this way into England, but do not seem to have been much of a success. The flavour is not unlike wild duck, but rather fishy. They are usually grilled, and served with apple sauce."

Game Cooking: A Collection of Recips with a Dictionary of Rare Game, Theodora Fitzgibbon [Andre Deutsch:London] 1963 (p. 243)
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(E?)(L?) http://www.fun-with-words.com/nym_words.html

"Tautonym" From Greek "taut" (= "same").


(E?)(L?) http://tierdoku.com/index.php?title=Tiere-A

  • Audubon-Sturmtaucher - Puffinus lherminieri - Aves
  • Balearen Schwarzschnabel-Sturmtaucher - Puffinus mauretanicus - Aves
  • Blassfuß-Sturmtaucher - Puffinus carneipes - Aves
  • Dunkler Sturmtaucher - Puffinus griseus - Aves
  • Graumantel-Sturmtaucher - Puffinus bulleri - Aves
  • Großer Sturmtaucher - Puffinus gravis - Aves
  • Huttonsturmtaucher - Puffinus huttoni - Aves
  • Keilschwanz-Sturmtaucher - Puffinus pacificus - Aves
  • Kurzschwanz-Sturmtaucher - Puffinus tenuirostris - Aves
  • Mittelmeer-Sturmtaucher - Puffinus yelkouan - Aves
  • Rosafuß-Sturmtaucher - Puffinus creatopus - Aves
  • Schuppensturmtaucher - Puffinus lherminieri - Aves
  • Schwarzschnabel-Sturmtaucher - Puffinus puffinus - Aves



(E?)(L?) http://jeff560.tripod.com/words6.html

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Some all-vowel Hawaiian names for birds which are used in English are
  • "AO" - "Puffinus puffinus" ("Manx shearwater"),
  • "UAU" - "Pterodroma phaeopygia" ("Dark-rumped Shearwater"),
  • "OEOE" - Oceanodroma castro" ("Harcourt's Storm-petrel"),
  • "IO" - "Buteo solitarius" ("Hawaiian Hawk"),
  • "OOAA" - "Moho bracatus",
  • "OU" - Psittirostra psittacea".
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(E?)(L?) https://www.spektrum.de/lexikon/biologie/puffinus/54912

"Puffinus" m, Gattung der Sturmtaucher.


(E?)(L?) https://www.synonyms.com/synonym/genus+Puffinus

Puffinus, genus Puffinus (noun) - "shearwaters"


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/aboutUs.html

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erhaps these are not as strange as the bird known scientifically as "Puffinus puffinus", though. Any guesses at the common name of this bird? All of you who think it's the "puffin" can put your hands down ... it's the "Manx shearwater". Why? A simple mix up with some eggs and chicks. Oh well, it's too late to change now.
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(E?)(L?) https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sturmtaucher

Die "Sturmtaucher" ("Puffinus") sind eine Gattung von kleinen bis mittelgrößen Meeresvögeln in der Familie der "Sturmvögel". Die Vögel dieser Gattung sind am ehesten in kälteren oder gemäßigten Breiten anzutreffen.

Die Arten der Gattung haben lange Flügel und eine dunkle Oberseite in braunen, grauen oder schwarzen Tönen. Die Unterseite ist meist heller bis vollständig weiß. Wie alle Arten der Familie haben sie röhrenförmige Nasenöffnungen an der Oberseite des Schnabels.

Beim Flug vollführen sie nur wenige Flügelschläge und gleiten längere Strecken. Bei einigen kleinen Arten sind die Flügel gerade gestreckt, während bei größeren Exemplaren ein Winkel beim Handgelenk erkennbar ist.

Als Brutplätze dienen ausschließlich Inseln und felsige Küstenabschnitte. Arten dieser Gattung brüten in Kolonien, die nur nachts angeflogen werden, möglichst in Nächten mit geringem Mondschein, um die Gefahr durch Greifvögel und große Möwen zu minimieren. Sie brüten in Erdmulden und legen nur ein weißes Ei. Abgesehen von der Brutzeit sind sie in ausgeprägtem Maße pelagisch. Viele Arten sind Zugvögel, die über lange Strecken ziehen. Der Dunkle Sturmtaucher ("Puffinus griseus") legt sogar Strecken bis zu 65.000 Kilometern in einer Saison zurück. Sturmtaucher sind extrem langlebig, in Freiheit wurde ein Alter bis zu 55 Jahren festgestellt. Als Nahrung dienen Fische, Kraken und andere Meerestiere. Manche Arten begleiten Fischerboote und schnappen den Fischereiabfall auf.
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(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puffinus

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"Puffinus" is a New Latin loanword based on the English "puffin". The original Latin term for shearwaters was usually the catchall name for sea-birds, mergus. "Puffin" and its variants, such as "poffin", "pophyn" and "puffing", referred to the cured carcass of the fat nestling of the shearwater, a former delicacy. The original usage dates from at least 1337, but from as early as 1678 the term gradually came to be used for another, unrelated, seabird, the "Atlantic puffin", an auk. The current English name was first recorded in 1835 and refers to the former nesting of this species on the Isle of Man.
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The genus "Puffinus" was introduced by the French zoologist Mathurin Jacques Brisson in 1760 with the Manx shearwater ("Puffinus puffinus") as the type species.
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(E?)(L?) https://www.yourdictionary.com/puffinus

"puffinus", A taxonomic genus within the family Procellariidae — several shearwaters.


(E?)(L?) https://www.yourdictionary.com/




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Puffinus
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. / Bot. "Puffinus" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1830 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2019-08

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
VA Staat Vatikanstadt, Estado de la Ciudad del Vaticano, État de la Cité du Vatican, Stato della Città del Vaticano, State of the Vatican City
Ornithologie (Vogelkunde), Ornitología, Ornithologie, Ornitologia, Ornithology

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Lederer, Roger
Burr, Carol
Latein für Vogelbeobachter
Über 3.000 ornithologische Begriffe erklärt und erforscht

(E?)(L?) http://www.dumont-buchverlag.de/buch/Roger_Lederer_Latein_fuer_Vogelbeobachter/15299

Warum sind so viele Vögel nach antiken Sagengestalten benannt? Und warum werden Würger auch als »Metzgervögel« bezeichnet? ›Latein für Vogelbeobachter‹ stellt mehr als 3000 vogelkundliche Begriffe vor und erklärt ihre Herkunft sowie ihre Bedeutung. Mehr als ein Dutzend Gattungen werden im Detail beschrieben, charakteristische Merkmale wie Vogelfärbung, Vogelgesang und Federn besprochen. Darüber hinaus porträtieren die Autoren außergewöhnliche Ornithologen wie den Verhaltensforscher Konrad Lorenz oder den Vogelkundler James Bond, der Ian Fleming als Vorbild für seinen Agenten 007 diente. Dieses sehr ansprechend gestaltete Buch ist ebenso informativ wie unterhaltsam und ein ideales Geschenk für Vogelliebhaber, die ein wenig mehr über die Hintergründe ihres Hobbys wissen wollen.

ca. 224 Seiten, Hardcover
H23,5 x B17,5 cm
256 farbige Abbildungen, 20 s/w Abbildungen

Originaltitel: Latin for Birdwatchers
Originalverlag: Quid, 2014
Datum der geplanten Veröffentlichung: 12.03.2015
ISBN 978-3-8321-9491-8


Erstellt: 2015-01

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