Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Grammatik, Gramática, Grammaire, Grammatica, Grammar

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grammarbook.com
Grammar E-Newsletter Archive

(E?)(L?) http://www.grammarbook.com/

FREE Online English Usage Rules

Grammar Rules Punctuation Rules Other Rules


(E?)(L?) http://www.grammarbook.com/newsletters.asp

2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011


Erstellt: 2015-02

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prowritingpartner.com
Guide to Grammar and Writing

(E?)(L?) https://prowritingpartner.com/grammar-guide/

While grammar is something we learn in the early years of our education, there are so many rules and regulations when it comes to grammar, we can’t know them all by heart. If you’re a writer or simply have to write something on certain occasions, you might want to reach for a grammar guide, to make sure that your writing is on point. And since there are so many aspects to grammar, there is more than one kind of a grammar guide, to make the process of learning and checking grammar faster and easier.

Thankfully there’s a large variety of grammar guides that are available to lead us through our writing process. Below you’ll find a helpful list of resources that will help you through your journey with grammar.
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Erstellt: 2017-09

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Grammar Girl
Grammaria (W3)

(E?)(L1) http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/grammar-girl
Das "Grammar Girl", das auf der durchaus lehrreichen Grammatikseite seine Dienste anbietet ist wohl ein Wortspiel auf "Glamour Girl".

Die Welt in der sie lebt heißt "Grammaria".

(E?)(L1) http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/grammar-girl

Grammar Girl

Your friendly guide to the world of grammar, punctuation, usage, and fun developments in the English language.

Mignon Fogarty



About Mignon Fogarty

Mignon Fogarty is the creator of Grammar Girl and the founder and managing director of Quick and Dirty Tips. A magazine writer, technical writer, and entrepreneur, she has served as a senior editor and producer at a number of health and science web sites. She has a B.A. in English from the University of Washington in Seattle and an M.S. in biology from Stanford University.

Mignon believes that learning is fun, and the vast rules of grammar are wonderful fodder for lifelong study. She strives to be a friendly guide in the writing world. Her archenemy is the evil Grammar Maven, who inspires terror in the untrained and is neither friendly nor helpful.

Grammar Girl provides short, friendly tips to improve your writing. Covering the grammar rules and word choice guidelines that can confound even the best writers, Grammar Girl makes complex grammar questions simple with memory tricks to help you recall and apply those troublesome grammar rules. Whether English is your first language or second language, Grammar Girl’s punctuation, style, and business tips will make you a better and more successful writer. Mignon Fogarty is the creator and host of Grammar Girl. Grammar Girl is a Quick and Dirty Tips podcast.


(E?)(L?) http://www.nealwhitman.com/GGscripts.html

Scripts written for Grammar Girl

(June 25, 2015)




Erstellt: 2016-02

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rutgers.edu/~jlynch
Guide to Grammar and Style
Lynch, Jack

(E?)(L?) http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Writing/index.html

Last revised 28 January 2011.


Erstellt: 2014-11

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University of Chicago Press Staff
The Chicago Manual of Style

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226104036/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226104036/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226104036/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226104036/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226104036/etymologpor09-20
Hardcover: 984 pages
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 15th edition (August 1, 2003)
Language: English

(E?)(L?) http://www.voanews.com/specialenglish/archive/2003-07/a-2003-07-24-1-1.cfm
July 24, 2003 - Chicago Manual of Style: University of Chicago Press is out with the 15th edition of "the essential guide for writers, editors, and publishers" -- what started as a way for its own proofreaders to ensure consistency.

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wordpress.com
Motivated Grammar

(E?)(L?) https://motivatedgrammar.wordpress.com/

About

Grammar is a contentious point. Some argue that it’s horrifyingly appalling that ANYONE would ever utter the words “I drive pretty good”. (This, of course, is because good is an adjective, good is modifying drive, which is a verb, and our forefathers fought and died so that verbs would never be subjugated by adjectives.) Some would even argue that you are a fool, an ill-educated ass, and a corner-dwelling dunce if you managed to emerge from your schooling without learning that periods are properly placed INSIDE of quotation marks.
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Erstellt: 2018-03

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youtube.com - WC
Word Crimes

"Word Crimes" von "Weird Al" Yankovic ist ein kleiner Grammatik-Kurs nach der Musik von Robin Thicke’s "Blurred Lines".

(E?)(L?) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Gv0H-vPoDc

"Weird Al" Yankovic - Word Crimes

a video chock-full of griping about other people's language


(E?)(L?) http:///




(E?)(L?) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyDUC1LUXSU

Robin Thicke - Blurred Lines ft. T.I., Pharrell


(E?)(L?) https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2014/07/29/you-say-expresso-i-say-espresso/

Lingua Franca

Language and writing in academe.

July 29, 2014 by Ben Yagoda

You Say Expresso, I Say Espresso …

I know, enough already about Weird Al Yankovic’s "Word Crimes", but bear with me for one more comment on the music video that’s given language prescriptivism it’s its biggest shot in the arm since the glory days of Eats, Shoots & Leaves. Perhaps the weirdest of the 17 admonitions Weird Al crams into the song comes at about the halfway point, when he croons, “There’s no x in espresso,” over this image:
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(E?)(L?) https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2014/07/22/word-pardons/

Lingua Franca

Language and writing in academe.

July 22, 2014 by Lucy Ferriss

Word Pardons

Weird Al’s "Word Crimes" video now has close to nine million hits, with the thumbs-up outweighing the thumbs-down more than 100 to 1. For those who take debates over prescriptivism in language usage seriously, there’s plenty of material for hand-wringing in the video, as evidenced by Lauren Squires’s perceptive piece in Language Log. But since there probably aren’t nine million people who have heard of prescriptivism in language, I wonder if there isn’t something else going on in the delight people seem to take in Weird Al’s ditty.
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(E?)(L?) https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2014/07/21/switchin-it-up/

Lingua Franca

Language and writing in academe.

July 21, 2014 by Anne Curzan

Switchin’ It Up

Linguists sometimes get discouraged about the rampant prescriptivism in public discussions of language. This past week was no exception, as many of us watched with some dismay as both friends and strangers online delighted over Weird Al Yankovich’s new song "Word Crimes". As this song showed yet again, it can take only the smallest spark to ignite a stream of invective about “abuses” in/to the language and about those who commit these perceived abuses.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/aap/article-2693687/Weird-Al-grammar-gaff-Word-Crimes-song.html

Weird Al grammar gaff in Word Crimes song

By Australian Associated Press

Published: 00:21 BST, 16 July 2014 | Updated: 00:21 BST, 16 July 2014

Weird Al Yankovic is so busy ripping pop stars apart with his musical parodies that he didn't notice his own mistake in his latest pop send up.

In Word Crimes, Yankovic's parody of Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines, the comedian is so busy preaching about grammatical errors that he, ironically, doesn't notice his own.
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(E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-crimes/

Weird Al’s "Word Crimes" and Prescriptive Grammar

Weird Al Yankovic’s latest album, Mandatory Fun, showcases his knowledge of grammar with the song "Word Crimes", a parody of last summer’s controversial hit "Blurred Lines". Among his peeves, Weird Al discusses the use of literally, whom, casual text speak, and apostrophes. Linguists view Weird Al’s new song as a teaching moment, though perhaps not of the variety that language enthusiasts might expect.


(E?)(L?) https://genius.com/Weird-al-yankovic-word-crimes-lyrics

Word Crimes Lyrics


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2014-July/subject.html




(E?)(L?) https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/weird-als-word-crimes-video

Weird Al's "Word Crimes" Video

Never mind, I give up.

By Mignon Fogarty , Grammar Girl


(E?)(L?) http://talkthetalkpodcast.com/171-word-crimes-2/

171: Word Crimes 2

5 August 2014 / Daniel Midgley / Comments Off

Weird Al Yankovic’s song “Word Crimes” combines grammar with music, and it’s fun to listen to.

But linguists are pointing out that these word crimes are not so felonious after all.

Linguist Daniel Midgley continues the investigation on this episode of Talk the Talk.


(E?)(L?) http://talkthetalkpodcast.com/170-word-crimes-1/

170: Word Crimes 1

29 July 2014 / Daniel Midgley / Comments Off

Weird Al Yankovic’s new parody “Word Crimes” is chock-full of grammar advice — but is it good advice?

Or is it just a three-minute-long language peeve session? What should we take from the song, and what should best be left alone?

Linguist Daniel Midgley tells you what you need to know on this episode of Talk the Talk.


(E?)(L?) https://twitter.com/alyankovic/status/490724455673372672

Al Yankovic

If you thought I didn’t know that I ended “Word Crimes” with a split infinitive… you don’t give me nearly enough credit.

22:06 - 19. Juli 2014


(E?)(L?) http://nancyfriedman.typepad.com/away_with_words/2014/08/index.html

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Weird Al’s “Word Crimes” parody song got all the ink, but I got a bigger kick out of another of his new songs, “Mission Statement,” which would be a spoof of corporate buzzwords if the subject weren’t already spoofproof. Watch the video and read about how TruScribe, a “video-scribing” company in Wisconsin, created the catchy and effective graphics. I learned about TruScribe via a Wall Street Journal blog post about the Yankovic video. One commenter wrote: “The beautiful part of this is that I can watch it at work with my headphones on and to anyone passing by it looks like I’m just watching some motivational business video.”
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(E?)(L?) http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=13552

"Spastic" and a different kind of "word crime"

July 20, 2014 @ 10:19 am · Filed by Ben Zimmer under Language and culture, Language and music, Taboo vocabulary

Weird Al Yankovic's new song "Word Crimes" has generated a lot of heated discussion among linguists and other descriptivist types who didn't take kindly to its litany of language peeves — satire or no satire. (See my original post and Lauren Squires' guest post for extended commentary.) But in detailing various "word crimes," Weird Al managed to commit a linguistic foul of his own. And no, I'm not talking about the split infinitive at the end of the song ("Try your best to not drool"). Weird Al assured his Twitter followers that the line was an intentional bit of trolling:
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(E?)(L?) http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=13455

Word Crimes

July 15, 2014 @ 11:15 am · Filed by Ben Zimmer under Humor, Language and music, Peeving, Prescriptivist poppycock

For his new album Mandatory Fun, Weird Al Yankovic has crafted the ultimate peever's anthem: "Word Crimes," to the tune of last summer's big hit, "Blurred Lines."


(E?)(L?) https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/blogexcerpts/weird-als-word-crimes-takes-on-language-peeves/

Blog Excerpts

Weird Al's "Word Crimes" Takes on Language Peeves

July 16, 2014

Weird Al Yankovic's "Word Crimes" video transforms Robin Thicke's scandalous "Blurred Lines" into a prescriptivist grammarian's screed. We think it's brilliant and are happy to see it getting much play in the language-loving community this week. Not since School House Rock's "Conjunction Junction" has a grammar lesson been this entertaining.
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(E?)(L?) http://weirdal.com/

“Weird Al” Yankovic


(E?)(L?) https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blurred_Lines

"Blurred Lines" (englisch für "verschwommene Linien") ist ein Lied des US-amerikanischen R&B-Sängers Robin Thicke, zusammen mit dem Rapper T.I. sowie dem Sänger Pharrell. Es wurde am 15. März 2013 veröffentlicht und erreichte in verschiedenen Ländern, darunter Deutschland und die USA, den ersten Platz der Charts. "Blurred Lines" wurde von Pharrell produziert und von ihm zusammen mit Thicke und T.I. geschrieben. Am 10. März 2015 entschied ein Gericht, dass Teile des Titels ein Plagiat des Titels „Got to Give It Up“ von Marvin Gaye sind und sprach den Erben eine Entschädigungszahlung von 7,4 Millionen Dollar zu.
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(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%22Weird_Al%22_Yankovic

Alfred Matthew "Weird Al" Yankovic, born October 23, 1959) is an American singer-songwriter, film/record producer, satirist, and author. He is known for his humorous songs that make light of popular culture and often parody specific songs by contemporary musical acts, original songs that are style pastiches of the work of other acts, and polka medleys of several popular songs, featuring his favored instrument, the accordion.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/comments/word_crimes/

Word Crimes

Dave Wilton, Wednesday, July 16, 2014

“Weird Al” Yankovic has a new video that’s making the rounds. It’s Word Crimes, a parody of Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines. It’s very clever (despite the “cunning linguist” chestnut; that ancient pun was only mildly amusing upon first hearing and just plain not funny subsequently; no self-respecting comedian should use it), but it’s also very wrong. Many of the “errors” that Yankovic descries are not wrong at all.

The things that Yankovic doesn’t understand about English: In short, Weird Al is exposing himself as a peever, someone who doesn’t understand that: There’s a place for artful, well-written English prose, but this kind of peeving has never led to better English, and when it’s wrong — as in this case — it tends to lead to stilted, poorly written prose.

Still, it’s an amusing and well-constructed parody.


(E?)(L?) https://seminartable.wordpress.com/2014/07/18/hey-weird-al/

Hey, Weird Al: Congratulations on Not Having a Language Disorder!

Oh boy. It’s no fun to be The Guy Who Takes Umbrage at a Novelty Song. So let me start by saying that, all things considered, I couldn’t be happier about “Weird Al” Yankovic’s recent viral resurgence. “Tacky,” his upgrade of Pharrell’s cloying “Happy,” is blue-chip parody pop: lively, goofy, subtly acerbic. (Subtext: you know what’s really tacky? Songs like “Happy.”)
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(E?)(L?) https://stancarey.wordpress.com/2014/07/23/the-problem-with-weird-als-word-crimes/

The problem with Weird Al’s ‘Word Crimes’

I’m late to the story of "Weird Al" and his "word crimes", and I’m too busy to do it justice, but luckily there has been a glut of good commentary already, some of it linked below.

First, the song, in case you’re catching up. "Word Crimes" is a new release from American comedian ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic, a novelty number about grammar, spelling and usage that borrows the template of a hit song from last year called "Blurred Lines". You might want to watch or listen first, if you haven’t heard it, and you can read the lyrics here.

The video can legitimately be called a viral sensation, having quickly hurtled past 10 million views on YouTube. I’d love to tell you I enjoyed it, but mostly I winced. The wordplay is ingenious, and the production is slick, but the message – and there is a message, parody or not – spoils it: it’s a "hotchpotch" of ill-informed prescriptivism, a mean-spirited rant about trivial linguistic errors, non-errors, and non-standard usages traditionally decried by hobbyist peevers.
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Erstellt: 2018-08

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