Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Euphemismus, Eufemismo, Euphémisme, Eufemismo, Euphemism

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euphemisms

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Erstellt: 2020-01

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casket (W3)

In den USA entwickelte sich das Schmuckkästchen engl. "casket" zum Euphemismus für dt. "Bestattungsurne" bzw. dt. "Sarg".

(E?)(L?) https://www.derstandard.at/story/2000041193004/die-sargfabrik

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"Casket" ist in den USA üblich. Was Mitte des 15. Jahrhunderts noch ein "Schmuckkästchen" war, entwickelt sich im 19. Jahrhundert zum "Euphemismus" für "Sarg".


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=casket
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "casket" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1600 auf.

Erstellt: 2019-12

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dictionary.com
euphemism

(E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/e/?s=euphemism

Search Results for: euphemism

Why Do We Use Euphemisms For Certain Body Parts? by Rachel Bradley Ah, childhood, those halcyon days when you chewed on a stuffed Mr. Snuffleupagus and cruised the driveway in your foot-pedaled convertible. Childhood was also the time when, hopefully, you learned how to peepee—with your wee wee, weenie, peenie, winkey, giney, or jay-jay. Ring any bells? Those goofy names remind us that childhood is also when our private parts are often given cutesy …

Political Euphemisms: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

A euphemism is a gentle word or expression for a harsh or offensive term.

What “Occupy” Used To Mean May Make You Blush

From Portland to St. Louis, the Occupy protests have been gaining momentum and continue to be front-page news. The protests sent us to the dictionary (where else?) to look up the etymology of the word “occupy.” We found an unexpected obsolete definition. The term occupy formerly meant something very different than its current common meaning. From the early 1500s to the 1800s, occupy

The Surprisingly Religious Background Of “Golly,” “Gosh,” And “Gee”

Gosh, golly, and gee casually express surprise or excitement, right? Well, yes, but when they were first introduced to the English language, these short words had a much more serious origin and purpose. Where did golly, gosh, and gee come from? While this folksy trio are informal interjections, they are also euphemistic alterations of the word God or, in the case of gee, Jesus. The use of gosh predates golly …

The Most Adorable Ways To Avoid Cursing

Sometimes, there’s nothing more satisfying than belting out a four-letter taboo—or a string of them. When little G-rated ears are present, however, cussing isn’t an option (“flipping freaking frothy fudgecicle!”). Whether overhearing ears are young and tiny or old and sensitive, inoffensive swearword stand-ins are often needed. To help ease the burden of sanitizing your swearing (it’s tough, we know), we’re delving into the origins …

What do you do with a swearing toddler?

Profanity is in the air, it seems. In 2010, the United States Supreme Court declared the censorship laws of the FCC regarding “fleeting expletives” unconstitutionally vague. We discussed that decision and the difference between swearing, cussing, and cursing here. Causing a bigger ruckus than Countdown, the popular American sitcom, Modern Family featured a swearing toddler in their latest episode. In this case, it was not a …

Zip, Zilch, Nada! 16 Ways To Say “Nothing”

What are you doing on January 16th? After all the holiday parties, events, and shenanigans, you can take this day in particular to relax. Why? January 16th is National Nothing Day! In a world that requires near-constant busyness, this day (and unofficial holiday) is an excuse to kick your feet up and do … nothing. National Nothing Day was proposed in 1972 by Harold Pullman …

How Does Adding The Word “Possible” Change News?

by Ashley AustrewWhat is a possible hate crime? A possible sexual assault? A possible terrorist attack? Crime-related news is often reported in the media using tentative language—like the word possible—that makes it seem as if there is room for doubt as to whether or not a crime was actually committed. But in many instances, either through video, photos, or the victim’s own words and evidence, it is …

Racist And Other Trending Words On Dictionary.com

From a Twitter meltdown by Roseanne Barr to a word dropped on Westworld, Hollywood had a major impact on the Dictionary.com trending word list the week of May 25–June 1, 2018. Racist, abhorrent, and repugnant A series of tweets by Roseanne Barr hit the news cycle this week, and they also helped boost a number of searches on Dictionary.com. Barr, star of the eponymous show …

Lexical Investigations: Hypochondriac

Hypochondriac Hypochondriac comes ultimately from the Greek word hypokhondria, which literally means “under the cartilage (of the breastbone).” In the late 16th century, when hypochondriac first entered the English language, it referred to the upper abdomen. The upper abdomen, it turns out, was thought to be the seat of melancholy at a time when the now-outdated medical theory of the four humors (blood, phlegm, yellow …

Pardon And Other Trending Words On Dictionary.com

From the president’s Twitter account to a horse with an unusual name, searches for the meaning of words took folks into some unusual areas of Dictionary.com the week of June 1–June 8, 2018. Pardon President Donald Trump’s assertion that he can pardon himself didn’t just have the Twitterverse talking. It also sent searches for the meaning of pardon up 328% this week. We can’t say …

Nephanalysis, Sitar, Wombat, And Other Words That Trended On Dictionary.com This Week

What do spivvy, smuggery, stingo, and schlemiel have in common? Sure, they begin with the letter S. But what’s more, they are also some of the leading lookups on Dictionary.com since July 8. Since our introduction of it in our last trending writeup, our ticker has been tirelessly scrolling across our homepage. And, we’ve continued to watch. So, let’s get started with our top five …

Last Month in Pop Language: Post Malone, Bill Clinton, and Other June Low Points

by Molly Rosen MarrinerThis is our fourth installment of Last Month in Pop Language, a column where the most popular (statistically) song, book, and film of the month will have their words analyzed in hopes of drawing a conclusion about language’s current usage—and future. At the end of each monthly column, we’ll draw a conclusion: Was last month’s pop language masterly, malevolent, or merely meh?————- Movie: The Incredibles 2 …

Last Month In Pop Language: “Nice for What” And Other April #1s

by Molly Rosen MarrinerThis is our second installment of Last Month in Pop Language, a column where the most popular (statistically) song, book, and film of the month will have their words analyzed in hopes of drawing a conclusion about language’s current usage—and future. At the end of each monthly column, we’ll draw a conclusion: Was last month’s pop language masterly, malevolent, or merely meh? Film: A Quiet …

Unprogrammed, Glen Coco, And Other Trending Words On Dictionary.com

Kanye West. Mean Girls. Brett Kavanaugh. What do they all have in common? Spots on the trending words list this week, September 29–October 5, 2018! Let’s get to all the learning, shall we? Unprogrammed Rapper Kanye West announced the creation of a new word over the weekend. Just one problem? Unprogrammed has been around for centuries. The word made its first landing on the trending …

Holy $#!%: Where Did The Symbolic Swear Come From?

Why is @#$%&! naughty? When the force of a swearword is too extreme (but some form of cuss must be used) symbolic stand-ins have long been used for lewdness. Suffice it to say, any emotional keyboard-striker can blurt out something that people perceive as a sub for swears. Whether it’s to diminish the force of swear, to get around censorship rules, or maybe just because symbols are @#$%ing cool to …

Why Do “Left” And “Right” Mean Liberal And Conservative?

During election seasons the words left and right denote political affiliation more than spatial direction. But where do these associations come from? The left hand has long been associated with deviance. The word sinister originally meant “to the left” in Latin. The word left comes from the Old English word lyft, which literally meant “weak, foolish.” To avoid the negative and superstitious associations of the left side, …

Incumbent, Misogynistic and Other Trending Words On Dictionary.com

The midterm elections weren’t just sending folks to the polls. Plenty of you landed on Dictionary.com the week of November 2–9, 2018 looking for answers. So what did we learn? Let’s review this week in words! Incumbent, House of Representatives, and gubernatorial The midterm elections dominated headlines this week, so it’s no surprise that more than a few election-related words showed up in our trending …

Decoding The PR Machine

Deciphering the language of hype Language can be used to avoid discussion just as much as it can be used to communicate effectively. For example: the language of public relations. Public-relations representatives often speak for corporate America, politicians, and the media. They know how to avoid topics and how to not answer the hard questions (tweaking language to fit a particular need at a particular …

“Bigot” remarks get CNN reporter fired. What does “bigot” mean exactly? (Its origin involves cussing)

Every so often, surprises seem to pop out of the mouths of public figures like a Jack-in-the-Box. CNN reporter Rick Sanchez lost his job Friday for a few eyebrow-raising comments he made on the radio. Among other things, Sanchez called the comedian and political talk show host Jon Stewart a “bigot.” The specifics of the remarks aren’t the concern of this blog. When thousands of …

13 Essential Literary Terms

confirmed bachelor

He never intends to put a ring on anything. Ever. A confirmed bachelor is a "man who never intends to marry." It has also been used as an offensive euphemism for a gay man.

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot

Based on letters of the military phonetic alphabet, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot is a euphemistic substitution for what the fuck or WTF.

see you next Tuesday

See you next Tuesday is a euphemism for the derogatory slang word cunt.

BLURGH! You Fracking Smeghead!

Aesopian

Where There’s Warmth, There’s Also Coolth: Long Lost Word Pairs

laying pipe

The expression laying pipe is a very visual euphemism for using one's penis to "have vigorous sex with" another. Tl;dr: Pipe is slang for "penis."

the D

Do you want the D? No, we don't mean Dictionary.com, alas. The D is an affectionate nickname for the city of Detroit, Michigan. The D is also a slang euphemism for dick, or "penis" or "sex" more generally.…

fronking

Fronking is a joke slang term referring to farting in water and then "biting" the resulting bubbles. It's also a euphemism for fucking, as in this fronking guy.

shlitty

Shlitty is a slang variant of shitty and litty, used especially when someone is getting drunk or having a good time partying. It can also be used as a euphemism or playful form to mean…

FFFF

FFFF is a vulgar slang acronym that refers to the misogynist motto, "find 'em, feel 'em, fuck 'em, and forget 'em." The 'em in this case? You guessed it: women-in-general. There are variations on FFFF,…

The Greatest Language Hits Of Black Music

Do You Remember This Fly 90s Slang?

Dog Idioms Inspired By Our Best Friends

Eskimo brothers

Eskimo brothers is a term that refers to men who have had sex with the same partner at different points in time. It can sometimes be considered offensive.

French-Inspired Slang That Makes English Sound Très Chic

We've gathered some French-inspired expressions and slang words that will have you saying ooh-la-la because everyone wants to speak a foreign language, right? Especially one that sounds so enticing.

disco stick

?? Let's have some fun, this beat is sick / I wanna take a ride on your disco stick. ?? Disco stick is a colorful euphemism for "penis" from the 2008 song “Love Game” by…

The Sh!t End Of The Stick: Bizarre Origin Rumors For Strange Idioms

A selection of bizarre origin stories behind some of our strangest idioms. The majority of these tales are at least ten feet tall, but some are actually true!

5 Important Historical Events That Changed Language

fux

Fux is an internet slang form of fuck.

Let Me Count The Ways: 10 Numerical Idioms

Charlie Foxtrot

Ten-hut, soldier! We drop boots at 0-800 and it is a Charlie Foxtrot down there. Charlie Foxtrot is military slang for a chaotic situation—that is, a clusterfuck.

happy ending massage

A happy ending massage is a massage that starts with the usual full-body rubdown but ends with a sex act, usually a hand job or a blowjob. Related words: erotic massage foot job table shower

How To Talk Like A Pirate

“Ahoy, matey!” Is that pretty much the limit of your pirate lingo? With perhaps a “shiver me timbers” in the wings if you need it? With so many excellent pirate terms, don't stop there! Here’s a robust vocabulary to make your weekend pirating just a little more authentic.

There’s a Word for That? 8 Fun Words About Words

milkshake

From a 2003 pop song of the same name, milkshake is a slang term for an attribute that makes a woman stand out.

mafa

We have had it with these mafa snakes on this mafa plane! Like mofo and muhfuh, mafa is a shortening of the slang, motherfucker. Related words: bad to the bone BMF d'fuq fux fuck this shit I'm out…

call of booty

Call of booty is a fanciful slang variant of a booty call, often as wordplay on the video game Call of Duty. It is often used as a pun in the porn, burlesque, and pirate-themed novelty…

Code Words You Use When All You Really Want To Say Is S.E.X!

We've compiled a list of those harmless, coded words for sex. Sit back and take notes about how to signal to your lover the next time you need a quick getaway.

rod

A stick, a handgun, a car, and an erect penis all walk into a bar... Believe it or not, these seemingly unrelated objects can all be referred to individually as a rod. ROD can additionally…

binch

Binch is an alternative, usually playful form of the coarse slang bitch, used especially online.

sacré bleu

Sacré bleu! Zut alors! Mon Dieu! The term sacré bleu is a dated, stereotypical French expression meant to express astonishment, shock, or amazement.

goat rodeo

A goat rodeo is a slang term for something going totally, unbelievably, disastrously wrong, and there’s nothing left to do but to sit back and watch the trainwreck. In other words, a goat rodeo is a chaotic…

Expressions For Epic Fails And Major Mistakes

jeepers creepers

People still say jeepers creepers? Guess so ... jeepers creepers is an exclamation you may use in surprise, exasperation, or fear, especially if there are kids around or you're from the 1950s. Related words: Jesus Christ! Minced…

What Is The Origin Of “Nepotism”?

Do you know the sordid history of this word?

facetiae

The peach emoji depicts a round, fleshy, orange peach. It is mainly used to represent a butt in digital communication, and so is more commonly called the butt emoji.

Digging Up Old Slang For Body Parts

8 Demographic Categories You Might Fall In

Advertisers often use demographics to target consumers. Similarly, pollsters and politicians use demographics to identify voting patterns.

BDE

BDE is an acronym. We all pretty much know what it stands for ... But, to spell it out BDE means big dick energy. It’s typically used to refer to (mostly cisgender) men, although not always.…

exoteric

verga

When does a word for penis not just mean "penis"? When it's the Spanish word verga. Verga can mean "penis," but also "rod," "fuck," "hell," and just about any vulgarity, it seems. This is a word we…

National Sex Day

National Sex Day is an unofficial holiday celebrated on June 9th. It is dedicated to having sexual relations with someone else.

Them’s Fighting Words!

Instead of scrambling for lightweight words in your next duomachy, throw off your opponent with these...enigmatical vocables.

You’re Probably Already Speaking This Jamaican Slang

We've rounded up some of our favorite examples of Jamaican slang in the language. Yuh ready?

dog-pile

A dog-pile is formed when a group of people jump on each other, often done as a children's game or in athletic celebrations. To dog-pile someone is to gang up on a person in mass…

party hats

A party hat is a pointed and colorfully decorated cardboard hat, worn over someone's head and usually at birthday parties. It's also slang for a condom.

bootch

Bootch is an alternative pronunciation or spelling of botch, butch, or bitch. It can also be an alternative form of booch, a slang word for "cocaine."

These Words Can Be VERY Awkward To Explain To Kids

Kids are like sponges. They soak in the words they hear and see around them, and slowly their vocabularies build. But, sometimes, the words kids see and hear are not exactly PG.

afternoon delight

Afternoon Delight is the name of a 1976 song by the Starland Vocal Band. The song, which contains innuendo about casual daytime sex (or an afternoon delight) was a hit. Because of the song’s popularity,…

alternative facts

Alternative facts have been called many things: falsehoods, untruths, delusions. A fact is something that actually exists—what we would call “reality” or “truth.” An alternative is one of the choices in a set of given…

The eggplant emoji is a long, purple eggplant, but it’s really just used to represent a penis.

I’m feeling lucky

I’m feeling lucky conveys hope for or optimism about a chance outcome, especially gambling. It is also the name of a Google search function.

MF

MF can stand for many things: mutual friends, Millennium Falcon, mezzo forte, mad flow, and medium frequency, to name a few. But we're pretty sure you came here for its most common meaning: motherfucker or motherfucking.

nice-nellyism

cake by the ocean

Cake by the ocean is a euphemism for having sex at the beach. It comes from the title of the band DNCE's 2015 debut single, "Cake by the Ocean."


Erstellt: 2020-01

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Shetter, William Z.
Language has its Powers

In einem nicht mehr online erreichbaren Artikel von William Z. Shetter aus dem Jahr 2006 war zu lesen:


No. 162

Language has its Powers

There are some words we often avoid saying

When someone has passed away, the grief therapist receives the client and prepares that loved one, makes arrangements, and soon the dearly departed is interred. Or in a more jaunty mood you might say that someone bought the farm and is soon pushing up daisies. All this might sound a little circumspect or evasive, when we really mean that when someone has died, the funeral director receives the corpse and sees to it that the dead body is soon buried.

All of us routinely avoid speaking words that have to do with death, but in many other areas we also seem to be reluctant to say something that is too ‘strong’ -

rest room, powder room

differently-abled, mentally challenged

collateral damage, device

pre-owned

sanitation worker, sanitation engineer

B.S., freakin’

the C-word

gosh darned, jiminy

Without much effort you’ll quickly think of hundreds more expressions that show a caution avoiding ‘strong’ words. But what makes these words ‘strong’? That’s the question we’ll come back to at the end of this Miniature.

The language is full of this kind of pussy-footing, some of which you may not even recognize as such. We’re talking of course about euphemism, which we can define something like “a word or expression intended by the speaker to be less offensive or objectionable than what it replaces.”

Our purpose here is not to collect them, which would be fun but does not give us much further insight. We don’t need to anyway, because you can easily find several good dictionaries of euphemisms. Instead we want to think about a more interesting question: Why do we use euphemisms at all? To look at this, we’ll take only religious euphemisms, a good example of which is that last example above. What means do we have if we want to circumspectly use God, Jesus Christ, the devil, hell and damnation in some sort of mild oath? The following words and expressions are a mere sampling of the most widespread euphemisms. There are many more for these and related words.

GOD we usually say golly, gosh, ye gads; by God is often by gum, begorrah, my goodness, goodness gracious, good grief.

Some old ones that now merely sound quaint are egad, gadzooks (God’s Hooks, referring to the nails on the cross), odds bodkins (God’s Body), zounds (rhymes with wounds; God’s Wounds).

GOD-DAMNED in ‘polite society’ most of us will say gosh darned, gol-darned or a Spoonerized version like doggone, dadgum, dadburn, dadblast, dingbust.

JESUS Jeez, Jeepers, Jiminy, by Jesus: by George, by Jingo, bejabbers. Probably the most common religious euphemism is Gee! Is this the first letter of God, or the first syllable of Jesus? Because in some religious traditions Jesus is called God, it is plain that the latter word often means the former (certainly in the above Gadzooks and Odds Bodkins).

CHRIST cripes, criminy, Christmas, for cryin’ out loud.

JESUS CHRIST Jiminy Crickets, Judas Priest, Judas Christopher, Jeezy Creezy, Jason Crisp, probably also Gee whiz, Gee willikers

LORD this word and the next do not figure in nearly as many euphemisms: my land, lordy

MARY Mother Macree, Cripes Mariah.

HOLY GHOST holy smokes, holy Moses, holy moley

DAMNED darn(ed), durn, dang, dash, drat, darnation, tarnation. The first five often with it added: darn it etc.

HELL what the heck, what the Sam Hill

DEVIL what the deuce, what the dickens

SWEAR even this relatively mild word is occasionally avoided: I suwanee. Also the folksy expression I swan to John, probably I swear by Jesus.

A reader of this essay sent in the one-liner "Heck is where you go if you don't believe in Gosh, Jeepers Creepers or the Holy Moley."

Now, are there any of these you didn’t even realize were euphemisms?

Back to the question of why we use euphemisms. The main reason, already part of the definition above, is to sidestep possible social consequences. We simply don’t want to risk offending other people - or sugar-coat the reality - by saying something ‘crude’ such as toilet, crippled, retarded, civilian deaths or bombs. Some are what we now call ‘politically correct’, others simply sound more prestigious such as replacements of the older second-hand, garbage man, janitor.

Some cannot even be written here because they are ‘flag’ words that will trigger blocking of this whole Miniature. Some readers will never even see this essay because of the bold-face four-letter words above.

A deeper reason why words such as religious terms are avoided - particularly in mild oaths - is that some are felt have a power to invoke the attention of what is spoken: God and Jesus Christ possibly out of a fear of using them inappropriately or the risk of calling forth too-powerful religious forces, and hell, damnation, devil out of a fear of invoking the adversaries themselves. This is equally true of death, cancer and many others.

Even in our modern secular society, some words possess a unique but largely unacknowledged power to call forth both good and evil. In this we’re very little different from our most distant ancestors. People throughout recorded history have shown awe of the force of certain ‘magic’ words.

Copyright © 2006 by William Z. Shetter


Erstellt: 2020-01

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thoughtco.com - 51Ef
51 Euphemisms for 'You're Fired'

(E?)(L?) https://www.thoughtco.com/euphemisms-for-youre-fired-1692800

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Euphemisms for Job Termination

Here, according to management guides and personnel documents found at a host of online human resources sites, are 51 bona fide euphemisms for job termination. ...


Erstellt: 2020-01

thoughtco.com - SSFWS
Soggy Sweat's Famous Whiskey Speech
How to Flatter an Audience With Euphemisms, Dysphemisms, and Distinctio

(E?)(L?) https://www.thoughtco.com/flatter-an-audience-with-euphemisms-1691833

One of the craftiest orations in the history of American politics was the "Whiskey Speech," delivered in April 1952 by a young Mississippi legislator named Noah S. "Soggy" Sweat, Jr.

The House had been debating whether to finally pop the cork on Prohibition when Sweat (later a circuit court judge and a college professor) decided to demonstrate his prowess for talking out of both sides of his mouth. The occasion was a banquet at the old King Edward Hotel in Jackson.
...


Erstellt: 2020-01

thoughtco.com - WdwuE
Why Do We Use Euphemisms?

(E?)(L?) https://www.thoughtco.com/why-do-we-use-euphemisms-1692701

Why Do We Use Euphemisms?

Words of Comfort and Words of Deceit

Euphemisms are substitutes for crude, hurtful, or otherwise offensive expressions. They bear the same meaning as their more taboo equivalents without seeming indecent.

Euphemisms manipulate the meaning of a word or phrase to make them appear more pleasant. Because the purpose of euphemism is to disguise semantics and avoid saying what is meant, it has been called "the language of evasion, hypocrisy, prudery, and deceit," (Holder 2008).

Euphemism Examples

The following examples of euphemism illustrate a few of its different uses. ...


Erstellt: 2020-01

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visualthesaurus - 2017
What is the Euphemism of the Year?

(E?)(L?) https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/evasive/what-is-the-euphemism-of-the-year-2017/

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Erstellt: 2020-01

visualthesaurus - 2018
Come On, You Know the Euphemism of the Year

(E?)(L?) https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/evasive/come-on-you-know-the-euphemism-of-the-year-2018/

Picking the Euphemism of the Year isn't usually easy. It's like choosing between my children, if I had any, and in fact had dozens of them, and I hated them all.
...


Erstellt: 2020-01

visualthesaurus - Aisu
"Alternative" is the Ultimate Euphemism Maker

(E?)(L?) https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/evasive/alternative-is-the-ultimate-euphemism-maker/

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Erstellt: 2020-01

visualthesaurus - WitE
What is the Euphemism of the Year?

(E?)(L?) https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/evasive/come-on-you-know-the-euphemism-of-the-year/

Picking the Euphemism of the Year isn't usually easy. It's like choosing between my children, if I had any, and in fact had dozens of them, and I hated them all.
...


Erstellt: 2020-01

voanews.com - FCiE
Finding Comfort in Euphemisms When Words Make Us Feel Uneasy

(E?)(L?) https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/finding-comfort-in-euphemisms-when-words-make-you-feel-uneasy-112263894/113699.html

Finding Comfort in Euphemisms When Words Make Us Feel Uneasy
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RS: Author Ralph Keyes defines euphemisms as comfort words that we use in place of words that make us feel uncomfortable.

RALPH KEYES: Today we no longer feel any strong need to say 'gad' or 'golly' instead of God. And yet euphemisms reflect changing values. We're much more likely today to make euphemisms out of words for money or money-related matters, for war, for death.
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RALPH KEYES: Well, you can tell what issues we're concerned about most. The oldest known "euphemism" is "bear". "Bear" is a derivation of "bruin", which means "the brown one". And some of our earliest ancestors in northern Europe were so afraid of this large, ferocious animal that they wouldn't even say its actual name. "Bear" has now become, of course, the standard word for this animal. We no longer know what the original word was.
...


Erstellt: 2020-01

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wordpress.com - EftS
Euphemisms for the stomach

(E?)(L?) https://stancarey.wordpress.com/2017/07/31/euphemisms-for-the-stomach/

Sometimes we use language to talk about something without referring to it directly – for fear of flouting social or moral convention, for fear of the thing itself, to conceal and deceive, and so on. In everyday discourse much of this falls under politeness and pragmatics: certain domains are taboo to whatever degree, so we employ euphemisms to avoid crossing a line of what is considered appropriate in the context.
...


Erstellt: 2020-01

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Euphemismus, Eufemismo, Euphémisme, Eufemismo, Euphemism

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Keyes, Ralph
Euphemania - Our Love Affair with Euphemisms
Finding Comfort in Euphemisms When Words Make Us Feel Uneasy

Gebundene Ausgabe: 288 Seiten
Verlag: Little, Brown and Company (14. Dezember 2010)
Sprache: Englisch


How did "die" become "kick the bucket", "underwear" become "unmentionables", and "having an affair" become "hiking the Appalachian trail"? Originally used to avoid blasphemy, honor taboos, and make nice, euphemisms have become embedded in the fabric of our language. EUPHEMANIA traces the origins of euphemisms from a tool of the church to a form of gentility to today's instrument of commercial, political, and postmodern doublespeak.

As much social commentary as a book for word lovers, EUPHEMANIA is a lively and thought-provoking look at the power of words and our power over them.


(E?)(L?) https://www.ebooks.com/en-de/499718/euphemania/ralph-keyes/?_c=1

"Euphemania - Our Love Affair with Euphemisms" by Ralph Keyes

How did "die" become "kick the bucket", "underwear" become "unmentionables", and "having an affair" become "hiking the Appalachian trail"? Originally used to avoid blasphemy, honor taboos, and make nice, euphemisms have become embedded in the fabric of our language. "EUPHEMANIA" traces the origins of euphemisms from a tool of the church to a form of gentility to today's instrument of commercial, political, and postmodern doublespeak.

As much social commentary as a book for word lovers, EUPHEMANIA is a lively and thought-provoking look at the power of words and our power over them.

Ralph Keyes is the author of 15 books, including "The Courage to Write" and "I Love It When You Talk Retro". He has written for Esquire, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, GQ, Newsweek, and Harper's. Keyes lives in Yellow Springs, Ohio, where he writes, lectures, and is a Trustee of the Antioch Writers' Workshop.


(E?)(L?) https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/finding-comfort-in-euphemisms-when-words-make-you-feel-uneasy-112263894/113699.html

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RALPH KEYES: A lot of pigs are going to die. But we're not comfortable saying "die". If you walk through old graveyards, and I've done this, sometimes even the old, old tombstones would talk about "Worms are eating his corpse" and "Soon, you shall be like me". Nowadays we wouldn't dream of using words like those. You know, people "pass", they "pass on", they "went over", you know, they were "called home".
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RALPH KEYES: The oldest known euphemism is "bear". "Bear" is a derivation of "bruin", which means "the brown one". And some of our earliest ancestors in northern Europe were so afraid of this large, ferocious animal that they wouldn't even say its actual name. "Bear" has now become, of course, the standard word for this animal. We no longer know what the original word was.
...


Erstellt: 2019-11

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Miller, P. Frederic
Vandome, Agnes F.
McBrewster, John
Euphemism. Minced Oath, Doublespeak, Politeness, Etymology
Willard Van Orman Quine, George Carlin
Periphrasis, Circumlocution, Dysphemism

Taschenbuch: 72 Seiten
Verlag: Alphascript Publishing
Sprache: Englisch

Erstellt: 2012-04

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