Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Rose, Rosa, Rose, Rosa, Rose
Wild Rosen, Rosas Salvaje, Rosiers Sauvages, Rose Selvatico, Wild Roses

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Dog Rose - Rose

"Rosa canina" (1753) steht für die ganze Gruppe der dt. "Hunds-Rosen", wie auch für eine einzelne Art, weshalb sie in der Literatur des öfteren für Verwirrung sorgt.

Vor dem 9. Jh. gab es in unseren Breiten lediglich die "Heckenrose" ("rosa canina"). Dt. "Heckenrose" ("Rosa canina", "Hundsrose") war eine der Bezeichnungen für die in Europa wild vorkommenden Rosen, die gerne zur Einzäunung verwendet wurde. Es war wohl auch die Rose, die Dornröschens hundertjährigen Schlaf beschützte.

Bot. "Rosa canina L." (1753) bedeutet wörtlich dt. "Hundsrose", frz. "Rosier des chiens", ndl. "Hondsroos", engl. "Dog Rose" (1597), nach lat. "canis" = "Hund", "Hündin".

The botanic name "Rosa canina" is derived from the common names "dog rose" or similar in several European languages.

Die "Rosa canina" wird auch dt. "Heckenrose" (verwendet zur Grundstücksbegrenzung) und bayr., ostöst., ugs. "Hetschepetsch", "Hetscherl" genannt - evtl. übernommen von, tschech. "sipek" = dt. "Heckenrose", "Hagebutte".

Als Begründung für die Namensgebung der bot. "Rosa canina", dt. "Hundsrose", ndl. "Hondsroos", engl. "Dog Rose", sind folgende Möglichkeiten zu finden: Die lateinische Bezeichnung "Rosa canina" für die "Hundsrose" ist eine Übersetzung des griechischen "kynósbatos", (das vom griechischen "kyon", "kynos" = dt. "Hund" und griech. "bátos" = dt. "Dornstrauch" wegen der vermeintlichen Wirkung (der Wurzeln) gegen die Tollwut abgeleitet wird) und bei Plinius u. a einen Sammelbegriff verschiedener Wildrosen bedeutet.

Eine weitere Erklärung:

"Sirius" heißt der "Augenstern". Unübersehbar bilden diesen "Augenstern" die nach dem Ausfallen der Blütenblätter sternförmig stehenden zipfeligen Kelchblätter. "Sirius", der hellste Fixstern, steht im Sternbild "Großer Hund"! Der Name "Hundsrose" hat also eine doppelte Aussage. Er bezieht sich auf das Sternbild, das auf der Nordhalbkugel im Rosenmonat Juni zusammen mit den Zwillingen und der Sonne am Taghimmel steht, und zugleich auf die höchst entwickelte grüne sternartige Kelchblattform.

Ihren Namen "Friggadorn" oder "Friggas Dorn" erhielt diese Rose von der weisen Gemahlin Odins, "Frigga", der mütterlichen Liebes- und Fruchtbarkeitsgöttin, die die Sprache der Tiere und Pflanzen verstand. Aus Dankbarkeit für den Beistand bei schweren Geburten vergruben nach gutem Verlauf Hebammen einst die Nachgeburt unter einem Rosenbusch.

"Ein Mänlein steht im Walde so still und stumm... " - wußten Sie, daß manche das "Männlein auf einem Bein" auf die Hagebutte der Hundsrose beziehen, die man auch "Hagebutze" oder "Heinzerlein" nennt?

Two explanations have been put forward for the popular name of this wild rose. The first is founded on an ancient tradition that the root would cure a bite from a mad dog (Pliny affirming that men derived their knowledge of its powers from a dream); and the other and more probable theory that it was the "Dag Rose" - "dag" being a "dagger" - because of its great thorns, and like the "Dogwood" (originally "Dagwood") became changed into "Dog" by people who did not understand the allusion.

(E?)(L1) http://www.apictureofroses.com/

Canina - Dog Rose


(E?)(L1) http://www.apictureofroses.com/cms/home/nameindex-lesroses.htm




(E?)(L1) http://www.apictureofroses.com/cms/class/canina.htm

Canina Roses - The Dog Rose


(E?)(L?) http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/r/roses-18.html

WILD ROSES The actual number of the roses indigenous to Great Britain is a subject open to dispute among botanists, as the roses found wild show many variations. Most authorities agree that there are only five distinct types or species:

"Dog Rose"

Botanical: "Rosa canina"

The "DOG ROSE" ("R. canina") is a flower of the early summer, its blossoms expanding in the first days of June and being no more to be found after the middle of July. The general growth of the "Dog Rose" is subject to so much variation that the original species defined by Linnaeus has been divided by later botanists into four or five subspecies. The flowers vary very considerably in colour, from almost white to a very deep pink, and have a delicate but refreshing fragrance. The scarlet fruit, or "hip" (a name that has come down from the Anglo-Saxon "hiope"), is generally described as 'flask-shaped.' It is what botanists term a false fruit, because it is really the stalk-end that forms it and grows up round the central carpels, enclosing them as a case; the real fruits, each containing one seed, are the little hairy objects within it. Immediately the flower has been fertilized, the receptacle round the immature fruits grows gradually luscious and red and forms the familiar "hip", which acts as a bait for birds, by whose agency the seeds are distributed. At first the hips are tough and crowned with the fivecleft calyx leaves, later in autumn they fall and the hips are softer and more fleshy. The pulp of the hips has a grateful acidity. In former times when garden fruit was scarce, hips were esteemed for dessert. Gerard assures us that 'the fruit when it is ripe maketh the most pleasante meats and banketting dishes as tartes and such-like,' the making whereof he commends 'to the cunning cooke and teethe to eate them in the riche man's mouth.' Another old writer says:

'Children with great delight eat the berries thereof when they are ripe and make chains and other pretty geegaws of the fruit; cookes and gentlewomen make tarts and suchlike dishes for pleasure.'

The Germans still use them to make an ordinary preserve and in Russia and Sweden a kind of wine is made by fermenting the fruit.

Rose hips were long official in the Pritish Pharmacopceia for refrigerant and astringent properties, but are now discarded and only used in medicine to prepare the confection of hips used in conjunction with other drugs, the pulp being separated from the skin and hairy seeds and beaten up with sugar. It is astringent and considered strengthening to the stomach and useful in diarrhoea and dysentery, allaying thirst, and for its pectoral qualities good for coughs and spitting of blood. Culpepper states that the hips are 'grateful to the taste and a considerable restorative, fitly given to consumptive persons, the conserve being proper in all distempers of the breast and in coughs and tickling rheums' and that it has 'a binding effect and helps digestion.' He also states that 'the pulp of the hips dried and powdered is used in drink to break the stone and to ease and help the colic.' The constituents of rose hips are malic and citric acids, sugar and small quantities of tannin, resin, wax, malates, citrates and other salts.

The leaves of the "Dog Rose" when dried and infused in boiling water have often been used as a substitute for tea and have a grateful smell and sub-astringent taste. The flowers, gathered in the bud and dried, are said to be more astringent than the Red Roses. They contain no honey and are visited by insects only for their pollen. Their scent is not strong enough to be of any practical use for distillation purposes.

Two explanations have been put forward for the popular name of this wild rose. The first is founded on an ancient tradition that the root would cure a bite from a mad dog (Pliny affirming that men derived their knowledge of its powers from a dream); and the other and more probable theory that it was the Dag Rose - 'dag' being a dagger - because of its great thorns, and like the 'Dogwood' (originally Dagwood) became changed into 'Dog' by people who did not understand the allusion.
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(E6)(L?) http://www.darwincountry.org/search?fields%5Bsearch_string%5D=rose
(E?)(L?) http://www.darwincountry.org/explore/003937.html?sid=4c53975b8e63aad991c2529036616597

"Red Rose", "Dog Rose", "Damask Rose". Plate 17 from Culpeper's Complete Herbal with The British Florist 1812. Shrewsbury Museums Service.


(E?)(L?) http://www.davesgarden.com/pf/go/2789/

PlantFiles: "Briar Rose", "Dog Rose", "White-flowered Rose", "Dog Briar", "Hondsroos", "Redoute Rose", "Rosa canina"


(E?)(L?) http://www.eol.org/pages/234403/overview

"Rosa canina" - "Dog Rose"
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Although you may expect a plant called "dog rose" is of lesser quality than other rose species, the name actually comes from the fact that this plant used to be "used to treat dog bites" (rabies). "Dog rose" is one of the least choosy woody plants in the rose family. It grows in sunny as well as half shadowy places and in all kinds of soils, with the exception of very nutrient-poor ground, acidic soil or peat. In the dunes, dog rose grows in sands where lots of plant materials degrade.
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(E2)(L1) http://www.flowersofindia.net/botanical.html

Rosa canina Rosaceae Dog Rose


(E?)(L?) http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Dog%20Rose.html

Dog Rose

It was believed that any plant given the name "dog" was christened so because it meant that it did not smell or was inferior to other plants. It was also believed that the root of this plant was effective against the bite of a mad dog. "Dog Rose" is a deciduous shrub 1-5 m tall, though sometimes it can scramble higher into the crowns of taller trees. Its stems are covered with small, sharp, hooked prickles, which aid it in climbing. The leaves are pinnate, with 5-7 leaflets. The flowers are usually pale pink, but can vary between a deep pink and white. They are 4-6 cm diameter with five petals, and mature into an oval 1.5-2 cm red-orange fruit, or hip. Interestingly the species name "canina" also stems from the common name "Dog Rose". "Dog Rose" is native to Pakistan, Kashmir, West Asia, Africa and Europe.


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/plant/plants.php

Dog Rose | Shiny-leaved Dog Rose


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/Peonies/plants.php?grp=A&t=2

Peonie: Dog Rose


(E?)(L?) http://www.heritage.nf.ca/dictionary/azindex/d.html

dog rose n Wild rose (Rosa nitida; R. virginiana) (1956 ROULEAU 29).


(E6)(L1) http://www.imagines-plantarum.de/cname2frm.html


(E?)(L?) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dog%20rose

Definition of "dog rose": : a chiefly European wild rose (Rosa canina)

First Known Use of "dog rose": 1597
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(E?)(L?) http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchresult.cfm?word=rose

Rosa arvensis = White dog rose. [Hudson field r


(E?)(L?) http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchresult.cfm?keyword=Rosa+canina




(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/dog rose


(E?)(L?) http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch

ROCA3 - Rosa canina L. - dog rose - (2)


(E?)(L?) http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch?keywordquery=rose&mode=comname&submit.x=14&submit.y=6


(E?)(L?) https://www.plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=ROCA3

ROCA3: "Rosa canina L." - "dog rose" 1/1


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/

"dog rose": prickly wild rose with delicate pink or white scentless flowers; native to Europe


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/duftrosen/wildrosen_a.htm

"Rosa canina L.", "Hundsrose", "Heckenrose", "Dog Rose", "Friggadorn", "Friggas Dorn"

Herkunft: Europa 1737 Wildrose, zartrosa einmalblühend (lange, Juni - August) leichter Duft nach Himbeere, kleine orange-scharlachrote länglich-ovale süß-säuerliche Hagebutten, die bei Vögeln sehr beliebt sind. Die Hundsrose wird mit ihrem Vitamingehalt der Hagebutten von 330 mg / 1oo g kommerziell für kulinarische und medizine Zwecke angebaut.
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Die Hundsrose ist in der Landgüterverordnung Karls des Großen aufgeführt als Heilpflanze und wächst als "Tausendjähriger Rosenstrauch" in Hildesheim.


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/namen_der_rosen/rosa_canina.html

"Friggadorn", "Friggas Dorn", "Heckenrose", "Heiderose", "Zaunrose" und mehr Volksnamen

Ihre vielen Volksnamen zeigen ihren Bekanntheitsgrad und die weite Verbreitung - "Buttelhiefen", "Dornapfel", "Dornrose", "Feldrose", "Hundsrose", "Hagrose", "Hagebutte", "Hagedorn", "Hagehotten", "Hagehüften", "Hagehüttchen", "Hagerose", "Hahnebödgen", "Hahneklöschen", "Hainhecken", "Hanbutbutten", "Haynbutten", "Hainrose", "Heckenrose", "Heinzerlein", "Hetschepetsch", "Hiefen", "Hiefenstrauch", "Hornrose", "Hüfften", "Hundsdorn", "Rosendorn", "Schlafkauz", "Schlafkunz", "Schlafdorn", "Wilde Heiderose", "Wiegenstrauch", "Wiepken", "Wipen", "Wirgen", "Zaunrose", "Wildhips".
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"Canina" heißt soviel wie "hundsgemein", was aber nichts mit Hunden zu tun hat, sondern bedeutet, dass man die Hagebutte überall finden kann und sie sich deshalb überall verbreitet.

Ihren Namen "Friggadorn" oder "Friggas Dorn" erhielt diese Rose von der weisen Gemahlin Odins, "Frigga", der mütterlichen Liebes- und Fruchtbarkeitsgöttin, die die Sprache der Tiere und Pflanzen verstand. Aus Dankbarkeit für den Beistand bei schweren Geburten vergruben nach gutem Verlauf Hebammen einst die Nachgeburt unter einem Rosenbusch.

"Ein Mänlein steht im Walde so still und stumm... " - wissen Sie, daß manche das "Männlein auf einem Bein" auf die Hagebutte der Hundsrose beziehen, die man auch "Hagebutze" oder "Heinzerlein" nennt? (Hagebuttenfoto)


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_canina

"Rosa canina" (commonly known as the "dog rose") is a variable climbing wild rose species native to Europe, northwest Africa and western Asia.
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Names and etymology

The botanic name is derived from the common names "dog rose" or similar in several European languages.

It is sometimes considered that the word "dog" has a disparaging meaning in this context, indicating 'worthless' (by comparison with cultivated garden roses) (Vedel & Lange 1960). However it is also known that it was used in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to treat the bite of rabid dogs, hence the name "dog rose" may result from this.

Other old folk names include "dogberry" and "witches' briar".
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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Rose, Rosa, Rose, Rosa, Rose
Wild Rosen, Rosas Salvaje, Rosiers Sauvages, Rose Selvatico, Wild Roses

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