Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Metanalysis (Buchstabenaustausch), Metanalysis, Métanalyse, Metanalysis, Metanalysis

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apricot (W3)

Katal. "abercoc", dt. "Aprikose", span. "albaricoque", frz. "abricot", ital. "albicocca", ndl. "abrikoos", engl. "apricot", bot. "Prunus armeniaca", geht über ndl. "abrikoos", frz. "abricots" (Plur.), span. "albaricoque" zurück auf arab. "al-barquq", "al-barqûq" = dt. "die Pflaume". Die Araber sollen es jedoch ihrerseits aus spätgriech., spätlat. "praecoca" = dt. "Pfirsiche", mit der wörtlichen Bedeutung dt. "frühreife (Frucht)", frz. "fruit précoce", (lat. "praecoquus" = dt. "vor der Zeit reif") übernommen haben.

In den europäischen Sprachen wurde also der arabische Artikel "al" (metanalytisch) mit zum lateinischen Ausgangswort "praecoca" übernommen. Während Spanisch und Italienisch das "al-" beibehielten, wurde es in anderen Sprachen zu "a-"verkürzt.


"Apricot" als Farbe: - #ff8e0d - Apricot




"Apricot" als Farbe: - #e8793e - Apricot




"Apricot" als Farbe: - #ffa161 - Apricot




"Apricot" als Farbe: - #ff6f1a - Apricot




"Light Apricot" als Farbe: - #ffb28b - Light Apricot




"Light Apricot" als Farbe: - #ee9374 - Light Apricot




"Apricot Buff" als Farbe: - #e8793e - Apricot Buff




"Apricot Cream" als Farbe: - #ffca86 - Apricot Cream




"Apricot Cream" als Farbe: - #ffdb8b - Apricot Cream




"Apricot Orange" als Farbe: - #e8793e - Apricot Orange




"Apricot Sherbet" als Farbe: - #ffb961 - Apricot Sherbet




"Apricot Tan" als Farbe: - #e8793e - Apricot Tan




"Apricot Tan" als Farbe: - #f7943c - Apricot Tan




"Apricot Yellow" als Farbe: - #ffd35f - Apricot Yellow




"Apricot Yellow" als Farbe: - #d79d41 - Apricot Yellow




"Apricot Yellow" als Farbe: - #e59e1f - Apricot Yellow




"Golden Apricot" als Farbe: - #ffa161 - Golden Apricot




"Golden Apricot" als Farbe: - #e8793e - Golden Apricot



(E?)(L?) https://www.alkohol-lexikon.de/ALCOHOL/AL_GE/apricot.shtml

Apricot Brandy


(E?)(L?) https://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/entry/summary32/

Entry from May 22, 2006

"Big Apricot" (summary)

"New York City" is "the Big Apricot" in a Superman comic where the city is also called "Metropolis".


(E?)(L?) https://www.bartleby.com/81/8942.html

"Irish Apricots" - "Potatoes"


(E?)(L?) http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/a/apric050.html

"Apricot" - Botanical: "Prunus Armeniaca (LINN.)"

Family: N.O. Rosaceae ---Synonyms---"Apricock". "Armeniaca vulgaris".

---Parts Used---Kernels, oil.

---Habitat---Although formerly supposed to come from "Armenia", where it was long cultivated, hence the name "Armeniaca", there is now little doubt that its original habitat is northern China, the Himalaya region and other parts of temperate Asia. It is cultivated generally throughout temperate regions. Introduced into England, from Italy, in Henry VIII's reign.
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(E?)(L?) https://www.deliaonline.com/search?s=Apricot

Apricot (Recipes Videos Content)


(E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/browse/apricot

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Origin of "apricot"

1545–55; Middle French "abricot", Portuguese "albricoque" or Spanish "albarcoque", "albaricoque", Arabic "al" "the" + "barquq" - Medieval Greek - Late Latin "praecocquum", for Latin "(persicum) praecox" literally, "early-ripening peach", perhaps referring to the "apricot" (see "peach", "precocious"); replacing earlier "abrecock" - Portuguese or Spanish; later "p" for Middle French "b" perhaps - Latin "praecox"
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(E?)(L?) https://www.etymonline.com/word/apricot

"apricot" (n.)

roundish, orange-colored, plum-like fruit, 1550s, "abrecock", from Catalan "abercoc", related to Portuguese "albricoque", from Arabic "al-birquq", through Byzantine Greek "berikokkia" which is probably from Latin "(malum) praecoquum" "early-ripening (fruit)" (see "precocious"). Form assimilated to French "abricot".

Latin "praecoquis" "early-ripe", can probably be attributed to the fact that the fruit was considered a variety of peach that ripened sooner than other peaches .... [Barnhart]

Native to the Himalayas, it was introduced in England in 1524. The older Latin name for it was "prunum Armeniacum" or "malum Armeniacum", in reference to supposed origin in Armenia. As a color name, by 1906.

Related Entries


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodreference.com/html/fapricots.html

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In Latin, "apricot" means "precious", a label earned because it ripens earlier than other summer fruits. A relative of the peach, the "apricot" is smaller and has a smooth, oval pit that falls out easily when the fruit is halved.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/l

Lambert, Edward

The Art of Confectionary

Shewing the Various Methods of Preserving All Sorts of Fruits, Dry and Liquid; viz. Oranges, Lemons, Citrons, Golden Pippins, Wardens, Apricots Green, Almonds, Goosberries, Cherries, Currants, Plumbs, Rasberries, Peaches, Walnuts, Nectarines, Figs, Grapes, &c., Flowers and Herbs; as Violets, Angelica, Orange-Flowers, &c.; Also How to Make All Sorts of Biscakes, Maspins, Sugar-Works, and Candies. With the Best Methods of Clarifying, and the Different Ways of Boiling Sugar. (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/u

The Apricot Tree (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L?) https://hpd.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=chem&id=2232

Chemical Name: "Apricot extract"


(E?)(L?) https://hpd.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=chem&id=687

Chemical Name: "Apricot kernel oil"


(E?)(L?) https://www.howstuffworks.com/search.php?terms=Apricot

Apricot


(E?)(L?) https://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=apricot

Limericks on "apricot"


(E?)(L?) https://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=apricot%20kernel%20oil

imericks on "apricot kernel oil"


(E?)(L?) https://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=apricot%20sickness

Limericks on "apricot sickness"


(E?)(L?) http://www.recipesource.com/baked-goods/desserts/cookies/apricot/

Recipes in this category:


(E?)(L?) https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Apricot




(E?)(L?) https://westegg.com/etymology/

"Apricot"

This term, which comes from the French "abricot" - and was "aubercot" until the Fifteenth Century - does not have one simple etymology, but rather a combination of several, involving a considerable juxtaposition of ideas. On the one hand, we have Portuguese "albricoque", Spanish "albaricoque" and Italian "albicocca", which all stem from the Arabic "al barqouq" or "al birquq", for the Iberian Peninsula owed much to the Arab gardeners of Southern Spain (Andalusia). The Arabic word means "early-ripe", and itself derives from the Latin "praecox" or "praecoquum malum" (in Greek, "praecoxon"), meaning "early-ripener" and "early-ripening apple", respectively (see the etymology of "apple"). This was the name given by the Roman legionaries when they first brought the fruit back to Rome, as they were returning from the Near East in the first century. Being easy to eat, it also was called "aperitum", "fruit which opens easily", and there is an association with Greek "abros", "delicate", for it does not travel well and ripens very quickly. The idea that there was a connection with Latin "apricus", "ripe", may have given rise to the "p" in English "apricot", which combines with the French "-cot" ending. Incidentally, the fruit is "Aprikose" to the Germans and "abrikos" to the Russians, but all these roads lead to Rome, from where the term - and the fruit - first spread throughout Europe.


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Arabic_origin_(A-B)

"apricot", "al-barquq", "apricot". Arabic is in turn traceable back to Early Byzantine Greek and thence to classical Latin "praecoqua", literally "precocious" and specifically "precociously ripening peaches", i.e. "apricots". The Arabic was passed onto the late medieval Spanish "albarcoque" and Catalan "albercoc", each meaning "apricot". Early spellings in English included "abrecok" (year 1551), "abrecox" (1578), "apricock" (1593), each meaning "apricot". The letter "t" in today's English "apricot" has come from French. In French it starts around the 1520s as "abricot" and "aubercot" meaning "apricot".


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apricot

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Etymology

Map of the etymology of "Apricot" from Latin via Late and Byzantine Greek to Arabic, Spanish and Catalan, Middle French and so to English

"Apricot" first appeared in English in the 16th century as "abrecock" from the Middle French, "aubercot", or later from Portuguese, "albricoque". The scientific name armeniaca was first used by Gaspard Bauhin in his Pinax Theatri Botanici (1623), referring to the species as Mala armeniaca "Armenian apple". Linnaeus took up Bauhin's epithet in the first edition of his Species Plantarum in 1753, Prunus armeniaca.
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(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_company_name_etymologies

"Apricot Computers" - early UK-based microcomputer company founded by "ACT" ("Applied Computer Techniques"), a business software and services supplier. The company wanted a "fruity" name ("Apple" and "Acorn" were popular brands) that included the letters "A", "C" and "T". "Apricot" fit the bill.


(E?)(L?) https://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2006-3-Mar.htm
lat. "præcocquum", griech. "prekokkia" became "berikokkia", arab. "birquq", "al-birquq", "albarcoque", "al-borcoq", "albricoque", "albaricoque", "abercoc", "abricot", "apricot"


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"precocious" – showing unusually early mental development (not necessarily complimentary)

Etymology starts with Latin "coquere" "to cook" or, figuratively, "to ripen". So an "early-ripening" fruit or flower would be "præ-" "before" + "coquere", or "præcox". In English "prœcox" became "precocious". It first applied to fruits and flowers, but soon was used figuratively for "early maturing" persons, and the latter use is now far more common.

"Præcox" also leads us to today's word, an "early-ripening" fruit which in Latin was described as, and later named, "præcocquum". Traveling east, in Greek it became "prekokkia" and then "berikokkia", and thence the Arabic "birquq". The Arabs carried "al-birquq" ("the birquq") back westward through northern Africa and into the Iberian peninsula, and by metanalysis the "al" became attached as part of the word: "albarcoque", "al-borcoq", "albricoque", "albaricoque" and "abercoc" (O.Sp; Sp.Arab; Port.; Span.; Catalan). Also "abricot" Fr. and "albercoccia" Ital.

Do you recognize this fruit? It is the "apricot". One new-beginning is that the Arabic "al" ("the") had become attached. ("Alcohol" was similarly formed from "al-kohl".) A second change is that in English the "abr-" beginning changed to "apr-", as in Shakespeare:

Go, bind thou up yon dangling "apricocks",
Which, like unruly children, make their sire
Stoop with oppression of their prodigal weight:


– King Richard II, Act 3, Scene 4

No one is sure why the "abr-" changed to "apr-". Perhaps it is because the word was mistakenly thought to derive from [lat.] "aprico coctus", "ripened in a sunny place".
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(E?)(L?) http://www.zompist.com/arabic.html

"apricot" - "al-burquq" - from Greek


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=apricot
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "apricot" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1640 / 1750 auf.

Erstellt: 2019-07

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Metanalysis (W3)

Die Bezeichnung engl. "Metanalysis" wurde - nach Oxford English Dictionary - im Jahr 1914 von dem dänischen Linguisten Otto Jespersen geprägt. Er kombinierte das mit dt. "mit" verwandte griech. "meta" = dt. "inmitten", "zwischen", "hinter", "nach", "zwischen-", "mit-", "um-", "nach-" mit griech. "análysis" = dt. "Auflösung", "Zergliederung", zu griech. "analýein" = dt. "auflösen", zu griech. "lýein" = dt. "lösen".

Otto Jespersen bezeichnete damit das Auflösen von Wörtern in Verbindung mit einer Neukombination. So wurde z.B. aus dem ursprünglichen altengl. "an ekename" das heutige engl. "a nickname" - durch Lösen und Neuanschluß des "n". Ein niederländisches Beispiel ist "ein Onkel", der zu ndl. "nonkel" ("den onkel" - "de nonkel") wurde. Die dt. "Orange" heißt noch span. "naranja" (das "n" in dt., engl. etc wurde als zum Artikel gehörig interpretiert).

Für engl. "Metanalysis" findet man auch engl. "Rebracketing" und "Resegmentation". Auch engl. "false splitting" und "juncture loss" sind Bezeichnungen in diesem Umfeld - allerdings mit leicht unterschiedlicher Bedeutung.

Unter "Metathese" versteht man, wenn zwei Buchstaben in einem Wort ihre Position tauschen wie z.B. "Bronn" - "Born" oder altengl. "hros" - "horse".

Beim Weglassen, Hinzufügen, Verschieben und Vertauschen von Buchstaben und Lauten stößt man im weiteren Umkreis auf folgende Verfahren:

Oxford English Dictionary

"metanalysis" Philol.

[f. met(a- + analysis.]

Reinterpretation of the division between words or syntactic units: as adder ‹ OE. nædre by analysis in ME. of a naddre as an addre. Hence me'tanalyse v. trans.


(E?)(L?) https://www.britannica.com/biography/Otto-Jespersen

Otto Jespersen, in full Jens Otto Harry Jespersen, (born July 16, 1860, Randers, Den. — died April 30, 1943, Roskilde), Danish linguist and a foremost authority on English grammar. He helped to revolutionize language teaching in Europe, contributed greatly to the advancement of phonetics, linguistic theory, and the history of English, and originated an international language, Novial (q.v.).
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(E?)(L?) http://www.krysstal.com/wordname.html

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Metanalysis is the process where a letter is added or subtracted because of a nearby word. Examples:

Modern Word 	- Original Form


a nickname - an ekename a newt - an ewt an adder - a nadder an apron - a napron an orange - a narange an umpire - a nonper



(E?)(L?) https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=22548

"Metanalysis": A technique currently popular in medical research, whereby all data from all available studies of something are combined, at times regardless of the quality of the data. The technique is used by researchers to get a maximum amount of statistical information (the most "power" possible), at times without worrying about distortion of the results.


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

metanalysis

Definition - A language-change process caused by the reinterpreting of word boundaries.

Example - The Middle English "a naddre" evolved into the Modern English "an adder".

Etymology - The word was coined by the linguist Otto Jespersen who combined the Greek "meta", "across", "with analusis", "loosening up".

Oxford English Dictionary - Its first citation is from 1914:

"I have ventured to coin the word "metanalysis" for the phenomenon frequent in all languages that words or word-groups are by a new generation analyzed differently from the analysis of a former age."

(O. Jespersen, Modern English Grammar, II. v. 141,)


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebracketing

"Rebracketing" [frz. "Mécoupure", "coupure fautive", "métanalyse"] (also known as "resegmentation" or "metanalysis") is a process in historical linguistics where a word originally derived from one source is broken down or bracketed into a different set of factors. It is a form of "folk etymology", where the new factors may appear meaningful (e.g. "hamburger" taken to mean a "burger with ham"), or may seem to be the result of valid morphological processes.

"Rebracketing" often focuses on highly probable word boundaries: "a noodle" might become "an oodle", since "an oodle" sounds just as grammatically correct as "a noodle", and likewise "an eagle" might become "a neagle", but "the bowl" would not become "th ebowl" and "a kite" would not become "ak ite".

Technically, "bracketing" is the process of breaking an utterance into its constituent parts. The term is akin to parsing for larger sentences, but it is normally restricted to morphological processes at the sublexical level, i.e. within the particular word or lexeme. For example, the word "uneventful" is conventionally bracketed as [un+[event+ful]], and the bracketing [[un+event]+ful] leads to completely different semantics. "Re-bracketing" is the process of seeing the same word as a different morphological decomposition, especially where the new etymology becomes the conventional norm. The name "false splitting", also called "misdivision", in particular is often reserved for the case where two words mix but still remain two words (as in the "noodle" and "eagle" examples above).

The name "juncture loss" may be specially deployed to refer to the case of an article and a noun fusing (such as if "the jar" were to become "(the) thejar" or "an apple" were to become "(an) anapple"). Loss of juncture is especially common in the cases of loanwords and loan phrases in which the recipient language's speakers at the time of the word's introduction did not realize an article to be already present (e.g. numerous Arabic-derived words beginning "al-" ("the"), including "algorithm", "alcohol", "alchemy", etc.). Especially in the case of loan phrases, "juncture loss" may be recognized as substandard even when widespread (e.g. "the hoi polloi", where Greek "hoi" = "the", and "the Magna Carta", in which no article is necessary because "magna carta" is borrowed rather than calqued, Latin's lack of articles makes the original term either implicitly definite or indeterminate with respect to definiteness [in this context, the former], and the English phrase's proper-noun status renders unnecessary any further determination through the use of an article).

As a statistical change within a language within any century, "rebracketing" is a very weak statistical phenomenon. Even during phonetic template shifts, it is at best only probable that 0.1% of the vocabulary may be rebracketed in any given century.

"Rebracketing" is part of the process of language change, and often operates together with sound changes that facilitate the new etymology.

"Rebracketing" is sometimes used for jocular purposes, for example "psychotherapist" can be rebracketed jocularly as "Psycho the rapist", and "together in trouble" can be rebracketed jocularly as "to get her in trouble".
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Examples of false splitting

In English

For a list of words relating to examples of "juncture loss" in English, see the English rebracketings category of words in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

As demonstrated in the examples above, the primary reason of "juncture loss" in English is the confusion between "a" and "an". In Medieval script, words were often written so close together that for some Middle English scholars it was hard to tell where one began and another ended. The results include the following words in English: ...
Examples of "juncture loss" ...


(E?)(L?) https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Jespersen

Jens Otto Harry Jespersen (* 16. Juli 1860 in Randers; † 30. April 1943 in Roskilde) war ein dänischer Linguist, der auf die englische Sprache spezialisiert war.
...


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Jespersen

Jens Otto Harry Jespersen (16 July 1860 – 30 April 1943) was a Danish linguist who specialized in the grammar of the English language.
...


(E?)(L?) https://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2006-3-Mar.htm

Let's look at the pattern of this week's words. In each case the division between two word-units shifted, to create a new word. This sort of change is common enough to have a name.

"metanalysis" – more generally: creation of a new word by reinterpreting the form of an old one

especially: such word-creation by reinterpreting the division between words (or between other units: roots, prefixes, etc.)

I have ventured to coin the word "metanalysis" for the phenomenon frequent in all languages that words or word-groups are by a new generation analyzed differently from the analysis of a former age.



Otto Jespersen (1914)

Jespersen in the above quote is more careful than I was. He makes no judgment of right or wrong: the change is not a mistake, but simply a new analysis by a new generation. In that spirit, perhaps this theme should not have been called "False Starts". A better name would have been "New Beginnings".

This week we've seen, in various tongues, migrating sounds involving a noun preceded by the definite or indefinite article ("the", or "a" or "an"). Thus "an apron" from "a napron", and "ammunition" from French "la (the) munition". Here is a migration involving a different preceding word, part of a familiar phrase. I crib from OED.

"rass" – Jamaican slang (coarse): the buttocks; also, a term of contempt [from "shove it up your arse".]

"Rass, man! Ah doan talk wid buckra." The expression "rass" is Jamaican for "shove it".

Ian Fleming, The Man with the Golden Gun

"Napron" lost an "n" by metanalysis, to become "apron". Here is a word that gained an "n".

"eke" – verb: "to add to", with the sense of making something go further by supplying what is missing, as "to eke out extra income". Gestures can eke out the meaning of your words.

It took hundreds of thousands of dollars in last-minute ads from a panicked National Republican Senatorial Committee for Burns to eke out a 14,000-vote win …

David Sirota, Washington Monthly, Dec. 2004

Thus an "eke-name" is an additional name given to a person. That's "an eke-name", but the "n" migrated to make it "a neke-name", which became "a nickname".

English "noumpere" (among other spellings) meant "one who decides a dispute". [From French adj. "nonper" [having] "no-par" or "no-peer"; "surpassing all others", and noun "nomper"; "one who so surpasses", for the essence of decider's role is to be above and apart from the parties.] The initial "n" then migrated, and "a noumpere" became "an oumpere" or "umpire"; later, the word "umpire" was extended to mean "one who decides" in sports.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Metanalysis
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Metanalysis" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1920 auf.

Erstellt: 2019-07

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precocious (W3)

Das griech. "prekokkia" wurde zu engl. "precocious" (~ 1650) = dt. "frühreif", "frühzeitig entwickelt", im übertragenen Sinne auch zu dt. "frühreif", "altklug".

Der Weg verlief - sicherlich mit einigen weiteren Schreibweisen - wie folgt: durch Kombination des Präfixes lat. "prae-" = dt. "vor", "voran", "voraus", "vor der Zeit", mit dem Verb lat. "coquere" = dt. "kochen", "reifen", entstand das Adjektiv lat. "praecox", "præcocquum", "praecocquum" = dt. "frühreif", "vorzeitig", "verfrüht" und das Verb lat. "praecoquere" = dt. "früh reifend". Mit des 16. Jh. entwickelte sich aus lat. "praecox" engl. "precocious" und bezeichnete Pflanzen, die Blüten bildeten, bevor die Blätter erschienen. Ab etwa 1670 beschrieb engl. "precocious" Menschen, die sehr früh Fertigkeiten und Talente zeigten, die sich normalerweise erst später einstellten. Schließlich nahm es auch die Bedeutung dt. "reif", "altklug" an. Das Substantiv engl. "precociousness" = dt. "Frühreife".

Aber lat. "praecox", (gen. lat. "praecocis") bzw. griech. "prekokkia" nahm auch einen kleinen Umweg, klaute sich den arabischen Artikel "al" (fachsprachlich "Metanalyse" genannt) und wurde zu dt. "Aprikose", span. "albaricoque", frz. "abricot", ital. "albicocca", engl. "apricot". In diesem Fall übernahmen es die Griechen als spätgriech. "prekokkia", griech. "berikokkia", die Araber machten daraus arab. "birquq", arab. "al-birquq", brachten es nach Spaniesn als span.-arab., altspan. "albarcoque", "al-borcoq", "albricoque", "albaricoque", span., port., katal. "abercoc", frz. "abricot", ital. "albicocca", engl. "apricot", dt. "Aprikose".

Warum aus "abr-" im Deutschen und Englischen "apr-" wurde ist ungeklärt. Möglicherweise hat man es hier mit lat. "aprico coctus" in Verbindung gebracht, das man etwa mit dt. "sonnengereift" übersetzen könnte (zu lat. "apricor" = dt. "sich sonnen").

Trees and fruits that flowered or ripened early were called "precocious" by the English in the early 17th century, the word deriving from the Latin "prae", "before", and "coquere", "to cook", which formed "praecoquere", "to cook beforehand". By the end of the century writers were applying this botanical word to people, especially children who are especially mature or learned for their ages, who are "cooked before their time".

"Decoct" boils down to a simple Latin origin: the word "decoquere", from "de-", meaning "down" or "away", and "coquere", meaning "to cook" or "to ripen". "Decoct" itself is quite rare. Its related noun "decoction", which refers to either an extract obtained by "decocting" or the act or process of decocting, is slightly more common but still much less recognizable than some other members of the "coquere" family, among them "biscuit", "biscotti", "cook", and "kitchen". Other "coquere" descendants include "concoct" ("to prepare by combining raw materials" or "to devise or fabricate"), "concoction" ("something concocted"), and "precocious" ("exceptionally early in development or occurrence" or "exhibiting mature qualities at an unusually early age").

"Precocial" and its partner "altricial" are really for the birds. Well, at least they are often used to describe the young of our feathered friends. The chicks of "precocial" birds can see as soon as they hatch and generally have strong legs and a body covered with fine down. Those are attributes you would expect in birds described by the word "precocial", which traces to the Latin "praecox", a term that means "precocious" or "early ripening" (yes, that root also gave us the word "precocious"). Ducks, geese, ostriches, pheasants, and quail are among the birds that hatch "precocial" offspring. "Altricial" chicks, on the other hand, are basically featherless and helpless at birth and require days or weeks of parental care before becoming independent.

"Precocious" got started in Latin when the prefix "prae-" meaning "ahead of", was combined with the verb "coquere", meaning "to cook" or "to ripen" to form the adjective "praecox" which means "early ripening" or "premature". By 1650, English speakers had turned "praecox" into "precocious" and were using it especially of plants that produced blossoms before their leaves came out. By the 1670s, "precocious" was also being used to describe humans who developed skills or talents before others typically did.

"Precocious": Unusually developed or mature, especially in reference to the minds of children.

In Latin, "praecox" was used to describe an early ripening. It is a combination of the prefix "prae", or "pre", and the suffix, from the infinitive "coquere", "to cook". Hence, a "precocious" child is, in the classic sense, "precooked".

(E?)(L?) https://www.anagrams.net/precocious

We've got 200 anagrams for precocious


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20040903082110/http://glossary.gardenweb.com/glossary/precocious.html

"precocious": Occurring early, as flowers appearing before the leaves; hysteranthous.




(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080629055225/http://www.bartleby.com/61/27/P0512700.html

"precocious"

ADJECTIVE: ETYMOLOGY: From Latin "praecox", "praecoc-", "premature", from "praecoquere", "to boil before", "ripen early": "prae-", "pre-" + "coquere", "to cook", "ripen"; see "pekw-" in Appendix I.

OTHER FORMS:


(E?)(L?) https://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/zea-mays-precocious-corn/

Zea mays ( Precocious Corn )


(E?)(L?) https://www.bartleby.com/81/13596.html

"Precocious" means ripened by the sun before it has attained its full growth; premature; a development of mind or body beyond one’s age. (Latin, prœ coquo.)
(E?)(L?) https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/part/71795#/summary

Title: Effects of Adult Male Cohabitation on Precocious Puberty in Early Weaning Female Guinea Pigs : COMMUNICATION : Reproductive Biology
Genre: Article
Date of Publication: 1988
Original Publication: Zoological science.
Volume: 5
Pages: 1137 - 1139



(E?)(L?) http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40519351

View Article


(E?)(L?) https://www.britannica.com/search?query=precocious&fuzzy=No

precocious


(E?)(L?) https://www.childrensbooksonline.org/Bookhouse_Volume_1/pages/092_My_Bookhouse_in_the_Nursery.htm

Precocious Piggy


(E?)(L?) http://www.classicsunveiled.com/romevd/html/derivc.html

lat. "coquo"

"apricot", "biscuit", "concoet", "concoction", "cook", "cookbook", "cooker", "cookery", "cuisine", "kitchen", "kitchenette", "precocious", "precocity", "terra-cotta" (adj.), "uncooked"


(E?)(L?) http://www.curioustaxonomy.net/etym/people.html

"Doronomyrmex pocahontas" Buschinger 1979 (ant)

Named for Princess "Matoaka", "precocious" daughter of Chief "Powhatan" who served as a bridge between the Native Americans and the English settlers of Jamestown. She is better known by her father's nickname for her, "Pocahontas", which means "little mischievous one".

The ant, from Alberta, Canada, is a threatened species.


(E?)(L?) https://davesgarden.com/guides/terms/go/2267/

engl. "precocious": "Appearing or developing early". For example, certain Magnolia flowers appear in early spring, before the leaves.


(E?)(L?) https://davesgarden.com/guides/terms/go/2589/

engl. "Precocious Yellow Gene": A gene of hybrid Cucurbita pepo squash, the presence of which causes yellowing of the first true leaves in cool weather and yellow fruit from the beginning.


(E?)(L?) https://www.definitions.net/definition/precocious

"precocious"


(E?)(L?) https://www.definitions.net/definition/precocious+dentition

"precocious dentition"


(E?)(L?) https://www.definitions.net/definition/precociously

"precociously"


(E?)(L?) https://www.definitions.net/definition/precociousness

"precociousness"


(E?)(L?) https://www.definitions.net/definition/puberty%2C+precocious

"puberty, precocious"


(E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/browse/precocious

"precocious", adjective ...
Origin of "precocious": 1640–50; Latin "praecoci-", stem of "praecox" (see "precocity") + "-ous"
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/browse/precocity

...
Origin of "precocity": 1630–40; - French "précosité", equivalent to "précose" (- Latin "praecoci-", stem of "praecox" "early ripening", adj. derivative of "praecoquere" "to bake or ripen early"; see "pre-", "cook") + "-ité" "-ity"
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/browse/cook

...
Origin of "cook": before 1000; (noun) Middle English "cok", "coke", Old English "coc" (compare Old Norse "kokkr", German "Koch", Dutch "kok") - Latin "cocus", "coquus", derivative of "coquere" "to cook"; akin to Greek "péptein" (see "peptic"); (v.) late Middle English "coken", derivative of the noun.


(E?)(L?) https://www.etymonline.com/word/precocious

"precocious" (adj.), 1640s, "developed before the usual time" (of plants), with "-ous" + Latin "praecox" (genitive "praecocis") "maturing early", from "prae" "before" (see "pre-") + "coquere" "to ripen", literally "to cook" (from PIE root ide. "*pekw-" "to cook", "ripen"). Originally of flowers or fruits. Figurative use, of persons, dates from 1670s. Related: "Precociously"; "precociousness".

Related Entries


(E?)(L?) https://www.fishbase.in/glossary/Glossary.php?q=precocious

"precocious":


(E?)(L?) https://www.grammar.com/precocious-vocabulary

precocious (adjective)


(E?)(L?) http://www.marthabarnette.com/learn_p.html#precocious

"precocious": Exhibiting unusually mature qualities at an early age.

A combination of the Latin stem "pre-", meaning "before", and "coquere", "to cook" or "ripen", eventually led to English "precocious", which, in its original sense, described "plants that bore fruit or blossoms early in the season".

Today "precocious" more often describes youngsters who might be described as "early bloomers". (The "coquere" in "precocious", by the way, is a relative of English "cook".)


(E?)(L?) https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=9647

P"recocious": Unusually early development of intellectual powers, speech, physical traits, and so on.


(E?)(L?) https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=9651

"Precocious puberty": The onset of secondary sexual characteristics, such as breast buds in girls, growth of the penis and thinning of the scrotum in boys, and the appearance of pubic hair in both sexes, before the normal age of puberty. (E?)(L?) https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/puberty

Puberty and "Precocious Puberty"

The onset of puberty, the time in life when a person becomes sexually mature, typically occurs between ages 8 and 13 for girls and ages 9 and 14 for boys. "Precocious puberty" is puberty that begins abnormally early, and "delayed puberty" is puberty that begins abnormally late. The NICHD and other NIH Institutes and federal agencies support and conduct research on the causes of "precocious puberty" and "delayed puberty". They also investigate the biology and chemistry of normal puberty to shed light on the mechanisms responsible for "precocious puberty" and "delayed puberty".
...





(E?)(L?) https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001168.htm

"Precocious puberty"

Puberty is the time during which a person's sexual and physical characteristics mature. "Precocious puberty" is when these body changes happen earlier than normal.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/precocious

"precocious", adjective:

...
Did You Know?

"Precocious" got started in Latin when the prefix "prae-", meaning "ahead of", was combined with the verb "coquere", meaning "to cook" or "to ripen", to form the adjective "praecox", which means "early ripening" or "premature". By 1650, English speakers had turned "praecox" into "precocious" and were using it especially of plants that produced blossoms before their leaves came out. By the 1670s, "precocious" was also being used to describe humans who developed skills or talents before others typically did.
...
First Known Use of "precocious": 1650, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for "precocious": Latin "praecoc-", "praecox" "early ripening", "precocious", from "prae-" + "coquere" "to cook"


(E?)(L?) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/precocial

...
Did You Know?

"Precocial" and its partner "altricial" are really for the birds. Well, at least they are often used to describe the young of our feathered friends. The chicks of "precocial" birds can see as soon as they hatch and generally have strong legs and a body covered with fine down. Those are attributes you would expect in birds described by the word "precocial", which traces to the Latin "precox", a term that means "precocious" or "early ripening" (yes, that root also gave us the word "precocious"). Ducks, geese, ostriches, pheasants, and quail are among the birds that hatch "precocial" offspring. "Altricial" chicks, on the other hand, are basically featherless and helpless at birth and require days or weeks of parental care before becoming independent.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/articles/PRECOCTY.xhtml

“Precocious Children,” by Samuel Goodrich; excerpted from Fireside Education (from The Mother’s Assistant, September 1844; p. 58)
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.onelook.com/?w=precocious&loc=wotd

We found 41 dictionaries with English definitions that include the word "precocious"


(E?)(L?) www.openculture.com/2018/08/pablo-picassos-masterful-childhood-paintings-precocious-works-painted-ages-8-15.html

Pablo Picasso’s Masterful Childhood Paintings: Precocious Works Painted Between the Ages of 8 and 15


(E?)(L?) https://www.poetry.net/poem/41322/the-precocious-baby---a-very-true-tale

The Precocious Baby - a Very True Tale – William Schwenck Gilbert


(E?)(L?) https://www.quotes.net/quotes/M/99999

Mozart was so precocious that, at the age of 35, he was already dead!

Fabrice


(E?)(L?) https://www.rhymes.net/rhyme/precocious

What rhymes with "precocious"?


(E?)(L?) https://www.synonyms.com/synonym/precocious

Synonymes for "precocious"


(E?)(L?) https://www.synonyms.com/synonym/precocious+dentition

Synonymes for "precocious dentition"


(E?)(L?) https://www.synonyms.com/synonym/precociousness

Synonymes for "precociousness"


(E?)(L?) https://www.thoughtco.com/beautiful-sounding-words-in-english-1692645

The Most Beautiful-Sounding Words in English

Competitions and Composition
...
Ilan Stavans, a Mexican-American essayist and lexicographer, dismissed the "clichés" on a British Council survey of beautiful words (which included "mother", "passion", and "smile") and instead nominated "moon", "wolverine", "anaphora", and "precocious".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.med.umich.edu/yourchild/topics/puberty.htm

"Precocious Puberty" (Early Puberty)

What is precocious puberty?

Precocious puberty means having the signs of puberty (development of breasts, testes, pubic and underarm hair; body odor; menstrual bleeding; and increased growth rate) earlier than usual. Precocious puberty is puberty that starts before age 8 in a girl or 9 in a boy.
...


(E?)(L?) http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/2004_06.html

...
More on winetalk culture
...
The Guardian article also says that ...


(E?)(L?) http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/2006_12.html

...
Crimson worm rhapsody
...
Just to increase my discomfiture, John Anderson (thanks a lot, John) has insisted on reminding me of the following facts about the staggeringly widespread Indo-European language family, which more than a millennium ago had already established itself from Iceland in the north-west to Ceylon (now Sri Lankaa) in the south-east, and was once found as far east as Chinese Turkestan:

the English word "head" is actually related in ancestry not only to "capital" but also to "chapter"; "precocious" is historically connectable to "apricot"; the word "hound" is related to "cynic"; and "weird" is related to "rhombus" (and "worm" and "rhapsody" and "stalwart" and "vertebra" and "wrath" and "wrong" and "wrestle" and "briar", of course). I repeat, I know perfectly well that these things are true. I just can't make it feel like they are.]
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.visualthesaurus.com/?word=precocious

precocious


(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/portlets/wod/?y=2015&m=08&d=1&mode=m
(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/portlets/wod/?y=2008&m=04&d=1&mode=m

Sunday, August 2nd

"precocious"

Somethin' from the Oven Word of the Day:

This word started out referring to plants that matured early but since people do that as well, it was only a matter of time before the word got its more usual meaning: to characterize someone developed beyond their years in some capacity. The Latin roots, curiously enough, mean "pre-cooked".


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/




(E?)(L?) https://www.waywordradio.org/learning-the-proper-pronunciation/

Learning the Proper Pronunciation

Posted by grantbarrett on May 2, 2014 · Add Comment

"Precocious" readers need not be ashamed of mispronouncing words like "misled" or "epitome" — it’s never too late to actually hear it pronounced properly for the first time, although it can be a little embarrassing.


(E?)(L?) https://www.waywordradio.org/arabic-sayings/

Arabic Sayings

Posted by Grant Barrett on May 19, 2012 · Add Comment

The Arabic idiom "in the apricot season" translates to "in your dreams", presumably because the growing season for this fruit is so brief. Incidentally, the etymological root of "apricot", which means "to ripen early", is shared with the word "precocious". The Egyptian Arabic saying "ate the camel and all it carried" is the equivalent of "to eat someone out of house and home".


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precocious

Precocious refers to earlier-than-normal development. The term may refer to:


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Browne

Sir Thomas Browne; 19 October 1605 – 19 October 1682) was an English polymath and author of varied works which reveal his wide learning in diverse fields including science and medicine, religion and the esoteric. His writings display a deep curiosity towards the natural world, influenced by the scientific revolution of Baconian enquiry. Browne's literary works are permeated by references to Classical and Biblical sources as well as the idiosyncrasies of his own personality. Although often described as suffused with melancholia, his writings are also characterised by wit and subtle humour, while his literary style is varied, according to genre, resulting in a rich, unique prose which ranges from rough notebook observations to polished Baroque eloquence.
...
Literary influence

Browne is widely considered one of the most original writers in the English language. The freshness and ingenuity of his mind invested everything he touched with interest; while on more important subjects his style, if frequently ornate and Latinate, often rises to the highest pitch of stately eloquence. His paradoxical place in the history of ideas, as equally, a devout Christian, a promoter of the new inductive science and adherent of ancient esoteric learning, have greatly contributed to his ambiguity in the history of ideas. For these reasons, one literary critic succinctly assessed him as "an instance of scientific reason lit up by mysticism in the Church of England".

However, the complexity of Browne's labyrinthine thought processes, his highly stylised language, along with his many allusions to Biblical, Classical and contemporary learning, along with esoteric authors, are each contributing factors for why he remains obscure, little-read and thus, misunderstood.

Browne appears at No. 69 in the Oxford English Dictionary's list of top cited sources. He has 775 entries in the OED of first usage of a word, is quoted in a total of 4131 entries of first evidence of a word, and is quoted 1596 times as first evidence of a particular meaning of a word.

Examples of his coinages, many of which are of a scientific or medical nature, include ...


(E?)(L?) https://archive.org/details/pseudodoxiaepide00brow/page/112

Book II. S.112, Zeile 13:

"Certainly many precocious trees, and such as have their spring in the winter, may be found in most parts of Europe."


(E?)(L?) https://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2006-3-Mar.htm

False Starts and New Beginnings: "apron"; "alligator"; "jade"; "munition" ("ammunition"); "metanalysis"; "rass"; "eke" ("nickname"); "umpire" ("noumpere"); "precocious" ("apricot")
...
"precocious" – showing unusually early mental development (not necessarily complimentary)

Etymology starts with Latin "coquere" "to cook" or, figuratively, "to ripen". So an "early-ripening" fruit or flower would be "præ-" "before" + "coquere", or "præcox". In English "prœcox" became "precocious". It first applied to fruits and flowers, but soon was used figuratively for "early maturing" persons, and the latter use is now far more common.

"Præcox" also leads us to today's word, an "early-ripening" fruit which in Latin was described as, and later named, "præcocquum". Traveling east, in Greek it became "prekokkia" and then "berikokkia", and thence the Arabic "birquq". The Arabs carried "al-birquq" ("the birquq") back westward through northern Africa and into the Iberian peninsula, and by metanalysis the "al" became attached as part of the word: "albarcoque", "al-borcoq", "albricoque", "albaricoque" and "abercoc" (O.Sp; Sp.Arab; Port.; Span.; Catalan). Also "abricot" Fr. and "albercoccia" Ital.

Do you recognize this fruit? It is the "apricot". One new-beginning is that the Arabic "al" ("the") had become attached. ("Alcohol" was similarly formed from "al-kohl".) A second change is that in English the "abr-" beginning changed to "apr-", as in Shakespeare:

Go, bind thou up yon dangling "apricocks",
Which, like unruly children, make their sire
Stoop with oppression of their prodigal weight:


– King Richard II, Act 3, Scene 4

No one is sure why the "abr-" changed to "apr-". Perhaps it is because the word was mistakenly thought to derive from [lat.] "aprico coctus", "ripened in a sunny place".
...


(E?)(L?) https://wordinfo.info/results/more%20precocious

precocious (adjective), more precocious, most precocious


(E?)(L?) https://wordinfo.info/searches/contents/P




(E?)(L?) https://wordinfo.info/searches/contents/T

true precocious puberty


(E?)(L?) http://wordquests.info/cgi/ice2-for.cgi?KEYWORDS=precocious




(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/1297

"precocious" a. [L. "praecox", -ocis, and "praecoquus", fr. "praecoquere" "to cook or ripen beforehand"; "prae" "before" + "coquere" "to cook". See 3d "Cook", and cf. "Apricot".]
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/nl/jyfs.htm
(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/worldwidewords/2013-February/000712.html

Newsletter 820 - 23 February 2013
...
Several readers pointed out following my piece on "nidicolous" and "nidifugous" that two other terms form a pair with senses that are equivalent. They are "altricial" and "precocial", introduced by the Swedish zoologist Carl Jakob Sundevall in 1836.

He coined the former from Latin "altrix", foster mother or wet nurse. "Altricial" refers to a bird or other animal born in an underdeveloped stage, needing care and feeding by the parent, the same idea as "nidicolous".

The latter is from scientific Latin "praecoces", the plural of classical Latin "praecox", early or premature. (You may know it from "dementia praecox", literally "early insanity", an old medical term for schizophrenia that presents in adolescence; it's also the root of "precocious".) "Precocial" means a creature hatched or born in an advanced state, able to feed itself almost immediately, the same sense as "nidifugous". It's curious that we've ended up with two equivalent pairs of technical terms.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.yourdictionary.com/precocious

"precocious"


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=precocious
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "precocious" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1590 auf.

Erstellt: 2019-01

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