Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretańa e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Sprachlich relevante Ereignisse im Jahr +1362

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bl.uk - TPwo
1362
The Parliament was opened with a Speech in English

(E?)(L?) http://www.bl.uk/learning/timeline/item126569.html

English as the language of government

1419

Intro

After the Norman Conquest of 1066, it took more than three centuries for English to oust French as the language of government. The parliament of 1362 was opened with a speech in English by the chancellor and then, in the early 15th century, Henry V became the first king since Anglo-Saxon times to use English in his written instructions.

In this letter

Henry V issued several letters during his second campaign in France. They all break with tradition by using English. This one, addressed to his regent, discusses the situation in the north of England and gives instructions on the Duc d’Orléans imprisoned at Pontefract Castle. Historians believe this is in the King’s handwriting.


Erstellt: 2017-10

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretańa e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Sprachlich relevante Ereignisse im Jahr +1066

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Hogg, Richard M. (Editor)
The Cambridge History of the English Language

(E?)(L?) https://www.cambridge.org/core/series/cambridge-history-of-the-english-language/11736033E53FA1FD5E1AE627BD7227CA

"The Cambridge History of the English Language" is the first multi-volume work to provide a full and authoritative account of the history of English. Each chapter gives a chronologically-oriented presentation of the data, surveys scholarship in the area and takes full account of the impact of current and developing linguistic theory on the interpretation of the data. The chapters have been written so as to be accessible to both specialists and nonspecialists and each volume contains a glossary of linguistic terms and a comprehensive bibliography and index.

Volume 1, The Beginnings to 1066
Edited by Richard M. Hogg
Print publication: 31 July 1992

"The Cambridge History of the English Language" is the first multi-volume work to provide a full account of the history of English. Its authoritative coverage extends from areas of central linguistic interest and concern to more specialised topics such as personal and place names. The volumes dealing with earlier periods are chronologically based, whilst those dealing with more recent periods are geographically based, thus reflecting the spread of English over the last 300 years.

Volume 1 deals with the history of English up to the Norman Conquest, and contains chapters on Indo-European and Germanic, phonology and morphology, syntax, semantics and vocabulary, dialectology, onomastics, and literary language. Each chapter, as well as giving a chronologically-oriented presentation of the data, surveys scholarship in the area and takes full account of the impact of developing and current linguistic theory on the interpretation of the data. The chapters have been written with both specialists and non-specialists in mind; they will be essential reading for all those interested in the history of English.

Volume 2, 1066-1476
Edited by Norman Blake

"The Cambridge History of the English Language" is the first multi-volume work to provide a comprehensive and authoritative account of the history of English from its beginnings to its present-day worldwide use.

Volume 2 deals with the Middle English period, approximately 1066-1476, and describes and analyses developments in the language from the Norman Conquest to the introduction of printing. This period witnessed important features like the assimilation of French and the emergence of a standard variety of English. There are chapters on phonology and morphology, syntax, dialectology, lexis and semantics, literary language, and onomastics. Each chapter concludes with a section on further reading; and the volume as a whole is supported by an extensive glossary of linguistic terms and a comprehensive bibliography. The chapters are written by specialists who are familiar with modern approaches to the study of historical linguistics.

Volume 3, 1476-1776
Edited by Roger Lass

This volume of the "Cambridge History of the English Language" covers the period 1476-1776, beginning at the time of the establishment of Caxton's first press in England and concluding with the American Declaration of Independence, the notional birth of the first (non-insular) extraterritorial English. It encompasses three centuries which saw immense cultural change over the whole of Europe: the late middle ages, the renaissance, the reformation, the enlightenment, and the beginnings of romanticism. During this time, Middle English became Early Modern English and then developed into the early stages of indisputably 'modern', if somewhat old-fashioned, English. In this book, the distinguished team of six contributors traces these developments, covering orthography and punctuation, phonology and morphology, syntax, lexis and semantics, regional and social variation, and the literary language. The volume also contains a glossary of linguistic terms and an extensive bibliography.

Volume 4, 1776-1997
Edited by Suzanne Romaine

This volume deals with the history of the English language from 1776 to 1997. An extensive introduction details the changing socio-historical setting in which English has developed in response to a continuing background of diversity as it was transplanted to North America and beyond. Separate chapters on phonology, syntax, and vocabulary chronicle the linguistic features of the language during this period, taking as the basis for discussion the common core inherited from the sixteenth century and shared by what are now the two principal varieties, American and British English. In addition, there are chapters on English as a literary language, English grammar and usage, and onomastics. A separate volume on North American English is in preparation.

Volume 5, English in Britain and Overseas: Origins and Development
Edited by Robert Burchfield

"The Cambridge History of the English Language" is the first multi-volume work to provide a full account of the history of English. Its authoritative coverage extends from areas of central linguistic interest and concern to more specialised topics such as personal names and place names. The volumes dealing with earlier periods are chronologically based, whilst those dealing with more recent periods are geographically based, thus reflecting the spread of English over the last 300 years.

Volume 5 looks at the dialects of England since 1776, the historical development of English in the former Celtic-speaking countries of Scotland, Wales, and Ireland, and at varieties of English in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia. This unique volume will be welcomed by all those interested in the spread of English around the world.

Volume 6, English in North America
Edited by John Algeo

Volume VI of The Cambridge History of the English Language traces the history of English in North America from its British background to its present position among the varieties of English used around the globe. The influences that have formed American English include the political, social, and cultural changes in American life, contact with other languages in North America, and continuing immigration from the British Isles and around the globe. In this book, sixteen leading authorities in the field consider how the vocabulary (both standard and slang), grammar, spelling, and usage in both the standard language and regional and social dialects have evolved in response to these influences, and examine the relationship of and interaction between British and American English. Separate chapters deal with African-American English, Canadian English and Newfoundland English and the volume also includes suggestions for further reading, a glossary of linguistic terms, and an extensive bibliography.


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Volume I - Contents


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Volume II - Contents


(E?)(L?) http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/samples/cam031/91013881.pdf

Volume III - Contents


(E?)(L?) http:///

Volume IV - Contents


(E?)(L?) http:///

Volume V - Contents


(E?)(L?) http:///

Volume VI - Contents


Erstellt: 2017-10

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