Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Gewürze, Condimento / Especia, Condiment / Épice, Condimento / Spezie, Condiment / Spice

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gernot-katzers-spice-pages
Gernot Katzer's Spice Pages
Spice Names

(E?)(L?) http://gernot-katzers-spice-pages.com/engl/index.html

On these pages, I present solid information on (currently) 117 different spice plants. Emphasis is on their usage in ethnic cuisines, particularly in Asia; furthermore, I discuss their history, chemical constituents, and the etymology of their names. Last but not least, there are numerous photos featuring the live plants or the dried spices.

List of all spices:



  • (E?)(L?) http://gernot-katzers-spice-pages.com/engl/spice_small.html

  • This index contains English and botanical names for all spices discussed on my pages. Names in other languages are found in the large (771?kbytes) Alphabetical Index, which currently holds almost 10500 plant names in more than 60 different languages. Readers not afraid of non-Latin alphabets will enjoy the special indices for Chinese/Japanese, Cyrillic, Indic, Hebrew and Arabic.


  • — A —
  • Abraham’s balm Achiote African grains of Selim African pepper-tree Agnus castus Ajowan Ajwain Alligator pepper Allspice Almond Ammi Anise Anise, Chinese Anise, Indian Anise, star Anise chervil Anise cicely Aniseed Anise pepper Annatto Arrowroot, Indian Arugula Asafetida Asafoetida (Ashanti pepper) Augue tree
  • — B —
  • Badian anise Baldina (Balinese pepper) Balm Balm gentle Balm-mint Basil Basil, Chinese (Basil, sacred) Bastard cinnamon Bastard saffron Bay leaf Bay leaf, Indian Bay leaf, Indonesian Bay leaf, West-Indian Bear’s garlic (Bee balm) Beebread Beefsteak plant Bell pepper Bengal pepper Benny, black (Bergamot) (Bergamot orange) Bishop’s weed Bitter almond (Bitter orange) Black benny Black cardamom Black cumin Black mustard seed Black pepper Black sugar Bladder seed Blue fenugreek Blue melilot Blue-white clover Blue-white trigonella Bog myrtle Boldina Boldo leaves Borage Brazil cress Brazil pepper Brown cardamom (Brown mustard seed) Bugloss Burrage (Burro pepper)
  • — C —
  • California pepper tree Candle berry Caper Capers Caraway Cardamom Cardamom, black Cardamom, brown Cardamom, greater Indian Cardamom, green Cardamom, Indian Cardamom, Nepali Cardamom, true Carom Carroway Carvies Cassia Cassia, Chinese Cassia, fagot Cassia, Indonesian Cassia, Jawa Cassia, Padang Cassia, Saigon Cassia, Vietnamese Cayenne pepper Celeriac Celery Ceylon cinnamon Chameleon plant Charnushka (Chase-the-Devil) Chaste tree Cherry, mahaleb Cherry, perfumed Chervil Chervil, Spanish Chervil, sweet Chile Chili Chilli Chilly Chinese anise Chinese basil Chinese cassia Chinese cinnamon Chinese ginger Chinese key Chinese lizard tail Chinese parsley Chinese pepper Chives Cicely Cilantro Cilantro, Puerto Rican Cilantro, Vietnamese Cinnamon Cinnamon, bastard Cinnamon, Chinese Cinnamon, Indonesian Cinnamon, Padang Cinnamon, Saigon Cinnamon, Sri Lankan Cinnamon, Vietnamese (Citron) Citronella Clove Clover, blue-white (Clusius pepper) Coconut Common nasturtium (Continental wild thyme) Coriander Coriander, long Coriander, Mexican Coriander, Puerto Rican Coriander, sawtooth Coriander, spiny Coriander, Vietnamese (Creeping thyme) Cress Cress, Brazil Cress, garden Cress, Indian Cress, Para- Cress, water Cubeb pepper (Cubeb pepper, false) Cumin Cumin, black Cumin, sweet Cumin, wild Cummin Curd herb Curry leaves
  • — D —
  • Date, Indian (Devil-in-the-bush) Devil’s dung Dill
  • — E —
  • English cherry Epazote (Eschallot)
  • — F —
  • Fagara Fagot cassia (False cubeb pepper) Fennel Fennel flower Fenugreek Fenugreek, blue Filè Finger grass Fingerroot Fishwort Fitweed Fragrant ginger Fragrant screwpine French parsley French tarragon
  • — G —
  • Galangale Galangale, greater Galangale, lesser Gale Garden chervil Garden cress Garden lovage Garden myrrh Garden nasturtium Garden poppy Garden rue Garden thyme Garlic German tarragon Gingelly Ginger Ginger, Chinese Ginger, fragrant Ginger, lesser Ginger, sand Ginger, Siamese Goosefoot, West Indian Grains of paradise Grains of Selim Grass, finger Greater galangale Greater Indian cardamom Greek hayseed Green cardamom Green pepper Guinea grains Guinea pepper (Guinea pepper)
  • — H —
  • (Habanero) Hayseed, greek (Hedge mustard) Hedge mustard (Hedge weed) Hemptree Herb of Grace Honey plant Horseradish Horseradish, Japanese Hyssop
  • — I —
  • Indian anise Indian arrowroot Indian bay leaves Indian cardamom Indian cress Indian date Indian parsley Indian saffron Indonesian bay leaves Indonesian cinnamon Indonesian lemon-pepper Ironwood, lemon
  • — J —
  • Jaborandi pepper Jamaica pepper Japanese horseradish Japanese pepper Japanese prickly ash Jawa cassia Jawa peppercorn Jerusalem parsley (Julienne, yellow) Juniper
  • — K —
  • Kaffir lime Kani pepper Key, Chinese Knotted marjoram
  • — L —
  • Lad’s Love Laksa plant Laurel Lavender Lemon Lemon balm Lemon grass Lemon ironwood Lemon myrtle Lemon-pepper, Indonesian Lemon-scented myrtle Lemon-scented verbena Lemon verbena Lesser galangale Lesser ginger Licorice Lily, resurrection Lime Lime, wild Lipstick tree Liquorice Lizard tail, Chinese Long coriander Long pepper Lovage (Love-in-a-Mist) Love Parsley
  • — M —
  • Mace Mace, sweet Mahaleb cherry Maiden’s ruin Mango Marigold, Mexican Marjoram Marjoram, wild Melegueta pepper Melilot, blue Mexican coriander Mexican marigold Mexican mint marigold Mexican pepper leaves Mexican saffron Mexican tarragon Mexican Tea Mint Mint, pepper- Mint, Vietnamese Mint marigold, Mexican (Monard) Moor pepper Mountain pepper Mugwort Mustard, hedge Mustard seed, black (Mustard seed, brown) Mustard seed, white Myrrh, garden Myrtle Myrtle, bog Myrtle, lemon Myrtle, lemon scented Myrtle pepper
  • — N —
  • Nasturtium Native pepper Negro pepper Nepal cardamom Nepal pepper Nigella Nutmeg Nutmeg flower
  • — O —
  • Old Man Old Man (Old Woman) Olive Onion Onion seed Opium poppy Orange (Orange, bergamot) (Orange, bitter) (Orange, sour) Orange, sweet Oregan Oregano (Oswego tea)
  • — P —
  • Padang cinnamon Paddy herb Paprika Paracress Parsley Parsley, Chinese Parsley, French Parsley, Indian Parsley, Jerusalem Pepper Pepper, alligator Pepper, anise (Pepper, Ashanti) (Pepper, Balinese) Pepper, bell Pepper, Bengal Pepper, black Pepper, Brazil (Pepper, Burro) Pepper, Cayenne Pepper, Chinese (Pepper, Clusius) Pepper, cubeb (Pepper, cubeb (false)) Pepper, green Pepper, Guinea (Pepper, Guinea) Pepper, Jaborandi Pepper, Jamaica Pepper, Japanese Pepper, Jawanese Pepper, Kani Pepper, long Pepper, melegueta Pepper, moor Pepper, mountain Pepper, native (Pepper, Peruvian) Pepper, pink Pepper, pod Pepper, red Pepper, sacred Pepper, Senegal Pepper, Sichuan Pepper, sweet Pepper, tailed Pepper, Tasmanian Pepper, water Pepper, white Pepper grass Pepper leaves, Mexican Peppermint Pepper rosé Pepper tree, African Pepper tree, Californian (Pepper tree, Peruvian) Perfumed cherry Pericon Perilla (Peruvian pepper tree) Pigweed, sweet Pimento Pimento Pink pepper Pod pepper Pomegranate Poppy Prickly ash Puerto Rican coriander Pumpkin seeds
  • — Q —
  • — R —
  • Ramson Red pepper Resurrection lily Rice paddy herb Rock cherry Rocket (Romanian brown mustard) Root beer plant Rose Rue
  • — S —
  • (Sacred basil) Sacred pepper Safflor Safflower Saffron Saffron, bastard Saffron, Indian Saffron, Mexican Sage Saigon cinnamon Salad rocket Sand ginger (Sarepta mustard) Sassafras Savory Saw leaf herb Sawtooth coriander Scallion (Scotch Bonnet) Screwpine, fragrant Screw pine flower Screw pine leaf Screw tree flower Screw tree leaf Selim, grains of Senegal pepper Sesame Sesame, wild (Sevilla orange) (Shallot) Shumac Siamese ginger Sichuan pepper Sicilian sumac Skunkweed Smartweed (Sour orange) Southernwood Spanish chervil (Spanish garlic) Spanish juice Spanish tarragon Spiny coriander Sri Lanka cinnamon St. Lucie cherry Star anise Stinking gum Sumac Sumac, Sicilian Sumach Sweet almond Sweet balm Sweet basil Sweet bay leaves Sweet chervil Sweet cicely Sweet cumin Sweet cumin Sweet gale Sweet laurel Sweet mace Sweet marjoram Sweet orange Sweet pepper Sweet pigweed Sweet scented myrrh Sweet trefoil Sweet verbena tree Szechwan pepper Szetchwan pepper
  • — T —
  • Tailed pepper Tamarind Tarragon Tarragon, French Tarragon, German Tarragon, Mexican Tarragon, Spanish Tarragon, winter Tasmanian pepper Tea, Mexican (Tea, Oswego) Thyme (Thyme, continental wild) (Thyme, creeping) Tonco bean Tonka bean Tonquin bean Toothache plant Trigonella, blue-white True cardamom Turmeric Turmeric, white
  • — U —
  • Umbrella tree
  • — V —
  • Vanilla Verbena, lemon Verbena tree, sweet Vietnamese cinnamon Vietnamese coriander Vietnamese mint
  • — W —
  • Water cress Water pepper West-Indian bay leaves West Indian goosefoot White mustard seed White pepper White turmeric Wild cumin Wild garlic Wild lime Wild marjoram (Wild mustard) Wild rocket Wild sesame Winter tarragon Wormseed (Wormwood)
  • — X —
  • — Y —
  • (Yellow julienne)
  • — Z —
  • Zedoary



  • Erstellt: 2012-12

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    rosmarine (W3)

    "Rosmarine" - eine Bildung zu lat. "rosmarinus" = dt. "Rosmarin"

    (E?)(L?) https://www.anagrams.net/rosmarine

    rosmarine


    (E?)(L?) https://www.definitions.net/definition/rosmarine

    "Rosmarine": fabulous sea animal which was reported to climb by means of its teeth to the tops of rocks to feed upon the dew.


    (E?)(L?) https://www.etymonline.com/word/rosemary

    "rosemary" (n.), late 14c., earlier "rosmarine" (c. 1300), from Latin "rosmarinus", literally "dew of the sea" (compare French "romarin"), from "ros" "dew" + "marinus" "of the sea", "maritime", from "mare" "sea", "the sea", "seawater", from PIE root "*mori-" "body of water". Perhaps so called because it grew near coasts. Form altered in English by influence of "rose" and "Mary".

    Latin "ros" is from PIE "*ers-" "to be wet" (source also of Lithuanian "rasa", Old Church Slavonic "rosa" "dew", Sanskrit "rasah" "sap", "juice", "fluid", "essence", Hittite "arszi" "flows", and perhaps also "Rha", Scythian name of the River Volga (see "rhubarb")).

    Related Entries: "*mori-", "rhubarb"


    (E?)(L?) https://www.wordnik.com/words/rosmarine

    "rosmarine"

    Definitions ...


    (E?)(L?) https://www.yourdictionary.com/rosmarine

    "rosmarine"


    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=rosmarine
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Dt. "rosmarine" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

    Erstellt: 2019-06

    rosmarinic acid (W3)

    "Rosmarinic" - eine Bildung zu lat. "rosmarinus" = dt. "Rosmarin"

    (E?)(L?) https://pubs.acs.org/action/doSearch?AllField=Rosmarinic+Acid

    Rosmarinic Acid (Results: 1 - 20 of 512)


    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=rosmarinic acid
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Dt. "rosmarinic acid" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

    Erstellt: 2019-06

    rosemary (W3)

    Die Bezeichnung dt. "Rosmarin", frz. "romarin", ital. "Rosmarino", ndl. "Rozemarijn", engl. "Rosemary", lat.-bot. "Rosmarinus officinalis", setzt sich zusammen aus lat. "ros" = dt. "Tau" und lat. "marinus" = dt. "zum Meer gehörig" und heißt demnach wörtlich dt. "Tau des Meeres" - vielleicht dank der silbergrauen Unterseite seiner Blätter oder weil er im Tau des Meeres besonders gut wachsen soll.

    Das Adjektiv bot. "officinalis" drückt aus, dass es sich um eine Arzneipflanze handelt. Eine "Offizin" ist eine Apotheke bzw. deren Verkaufsraum.

    Die Herleitung dt. "Tau des Meeres" ist jedoch nicht unumstritten. So wird der wissenschaftliche Gattungsname "Rosmarinus" auch auf griech. "rhops" = dt. "Gebüsch" und griech. "myrinos" = dt. "wohlriechend" zurück geführt.


    "Rosemary" als Farbe: - #7d4d5d - Rosemary



    Aus einer nicht mehr aufrufbaren Quelle:


    "rosemary": The homely herb "rosemary" was originally called by the Latin name "ros marinus", "sea dew", because it was often found on the sea cliffs in southern France. But over the years ros sounded more like "rose" to English ears, and "marinus" suggested the common name "Mary". The herb was thus dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and the word "rosemary" was recorded as early as 1440.

    This flowering shrub has contributed its dried leaves and stems to many recipes, and oils from its leaves and flowers figure in numerous potions and perfumes. Bouquets of rosemary, “emblematical of manly virtues,” were once presented to bridegrooms on their wedding mornings, and bridal beds are still bedecked with the flowers in certain Europe an countries to ensure conjugal bliss. Rosemary symbolizes remembrance, and Shakespeare’s Ophelia presented a bunch to Hamlet, perhaps to remind him of their meeting on Saint Valentine’s Day when the melancholy Dane “Let in the maid, that out a maid / Never departed more.”


    (E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20050930180351/http://16.1911encyclopedia.org/R/RO/ROSEMARY.htm

    ROSEMARY, botanically Rosmarinus, a Labiate plant, the only representative of the genus and a native of the Mediterranean region.
    ...


    (E?)(L?) https://www.bartleby.com/81/14517.html

    Rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://www.bettycrocker.com/search?term=Rosemary&termDataSource=d6fb75f5-d19a-49cd-9ba0-c10a6e45afb2

    350 results for "Rosemary"


    (E?)(L?) https://bladmineerders.nl/host-plants/plantae/spermatopsida/angiosperma/eudicots/superasterids/asterids/lamiids/lamiales/lamiaceae/nepetoideae/mentheae/rosmarinus/

    Rosmarinus - rosemary - Dichotomous table for leafminers


    (E?)(L?) http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/r/rosema17.html

    "Rosemary"
    Botanical: "Rosmarinus officinalis (LINN.)"
    Family: N.O. Labiatae Synonyms: "Polar Plant". "Compass-weed". "Compass Plant". "Rosmarinus coronarium". (Old French) "Incensier".
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.classicsunveiled.com/romevd/html/derivm.html

    "mare": "cormorant", "marinate", "marine", "mariner", "maritime", "rosemary", "submarine"


    (E?)(L?) https://www.dailywritingtips.com/more-names-of-plants-food/

    engl. "rosemary": The name of this herb has nothing to do with the "rose" or the name "Mary"; it is a corruption of "rosmarine", from the Latin term "rosmarinus", meaning "dew of the sea", alluding to the flourishing of the plant near coasts. ("Marinus", from which "marine" is derived, means "from the sea".)


    (E?)(L?) https://www.definitions.net/definition/rosemary

    rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://www.deliaonline.com/search?s=Rosemary

    20 results for Rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/browse/rosemary

    rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://www.etymonline.com/word/rosemary

    "rosemary" (n.), late 14c., earlier "rosmarine" (c. 1300), from Latin "rosmarinus", literally "dew of the sea" (compare French "romarin"), from "ros" "dew" + "marinus" "of the sea", "maritime", from "mare" "sea", "the sea", "seawater", from PIE root "*mori-" "body of water". Perhaps so called because it grew near coasts. Form altered in English by influence of "rose" and "Mary".

    Latin "ros" is from PIE "*ers-" "to be wet" (source also of Lithuanian "rasa", Old Church Slavonic "rosa" "dew", Sanskrit "rasah" "sap", "juice", "fluid", "essence", Hittite "arszi" "flows", and perhaps also "Rha", Scythian name of the River Volga (see "rhubarb")).

    Related Entries: "*mori-", "rhubarb"


    (E?)(L?) https://www.etymonline.com/word/*mori-

    ide. "*mori-" - Proto-Indo-European root meaning "body of water".

    It forms all or part of: "aquamarine"; "Armorica"; "beche-de-mer"; "cormorant"; "mare" (n.2) "broad, dark areas of the moon"; "marina"; "marinate"; "marine"; "mariner"; "maritime"; "marsh"; "mere" (n.1) "lake", "pool"; "Merlin"; "mermaid"; "merman"; "meerschaum"; "meerkat"; "morass"; "Muriel"; "rosemary"; "submarine"; "ultramarine"; "Weimar".

    It is the hypothetical source of / evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin "mare"; Old Church Slavonic "morje", Russian "more", Lithuanian "mares", Old Irish "muir", Welsh "mor" "sea"; Old English "mere" "sea", "ocean"; "lake", "pool", German "Meer" "sea".


    (E?)(L?) http://gernot-katzers-spice-pages.com/engl/Rosm_off.html

    "Rosemary" ("Rosmarinus officinalis L.")

    Synonyms (View the names of this plant in 60 languages) ...
    Etymology

    In Latin tongue, the plant was called "rosmarinus"; most sources interpret this as made from "ros" "dew" (akin to Sanskrit "rasa" [??] "sap", "juice") and "marinus" "belonging to the sea" (from Latin "mare" "sea", derived from the Proto-Indo–European root "MORI" "water"; "lake"; cf. "marine" and "mermaid").

    Truly, "rosemary" often grows at low altitude and therefore near the sea. It does, however, not typically populate the coast, where the spray of sea water might motivate the name "dew of the sea". Possibly, the name refers not to the habitat but to the sea-blue flowers of "rosemary". It has been argued that "rosmarinus" itself is a product of folk etymology. Possible candidates for the original name are Greek "rhops" "shrub" and "myron" "balm", which make a good name for the aromatic plant, but pose more linguistic problems (see also nutmeg for the etymology of "myron"). Lastly, the Greek name of "sumac", "rhous", is sometimes set into relation with "rosmarinus".

    Most European languages have names for "rosemary" that still much resemble the original Latin "rosmarinus": German "Rosmarin", Finnish "rosmariini", Italian "ramerino", Spanish "romero", Basque "erromero", Albanian "rozmarinë", Serbo-Croatian "ružmarin", Bulgarian "rozmarin" and Greek "rozmari". In Greek, however, it is more common to call "rosemary" "dendrolivano", which literally mean "incense tree": "livani" incense" und "dendro tree". See also juniper for the linguistic affiliation of the latter.

    Arabic "al-iklil al-jabal" and Persian "eklil kuhi" both mean crown of the mountain, but I cannot get what these names is referring to. Shortened to "al-iklil" "the crown", the Arabic name is the source of the modern Portuguese name of "rosemary", "al­ecrim". See also "caper" for further Iberic loans of Arabic plant names. Strangely, there is a related herb whose name is also often connected to mountain without convincing semantic explanation: "oregano" is often suspected to derive Greek "oros" "mountain".
    ...


    (E?)(L?) https://www.growveg.com/plants/us-and-canada/how-to-grow-rosemary/

    Rosemary Growing Guide


    (E?)(L?) https://h2g2.com/search?search_type=article_quick_search&searchstring=Rosemary&approved_entries_only_chk=1

    Entry search results for: Rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://home.howstuffworks.com/define-rosemary.htm

    Rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://www.lyrics.com/artist/Rosemary/527339

    Rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1236

    Alecrim - Rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://www.plattentests.de/rezi.php?show=14805

    Rosemary & Garlic


    (E?)(L?) http://projetbabel.org/basque/dictionnaire.php?q=erramero

    bask. "erramero"


    (E?)(L?) http://projetbabel.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1868

    rosemary (anglais )


    (E?)(L?) http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/o/?i=770595&pleasewait=1&msg=sr

    "rosemary" occurs 7 times in 7 speeches within 5 works.


    (E?)(L?) https://spanishetymology.com/rocio-and-rosemary/

    "Rocío" and "Rosemary"

    Posted by Morgan on Apr 7, 2019 in Spanish, True Spanish Etymology Stories

    "Rocío" (Spanish for "dew", not to mention its cousin, "rociar", "to sprink or spray") comes the Latin "ros" ("dew".)

    From that same root, we get the English "rosemary", everyone’s favorite mint! "Rosemary" in fact comes from the Latin "rosmarinus" ("ros" – "marinus"), the "dew of the sea"!

    The "r-c" of "rocío" clearly maps to the "r-s" of "rosemary".


    (E?)(L?) https://www.synonyms.com/synonym/rosemary

    rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://www.thefreedictionary.com/rosemary

    rosemary


    (E?)(L?) https://www.thespruceeats.com/history-of-rosemary-1807655

    Rosemary History

    Rosemary has long been used in holistic medicines
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://verbmall.blogspot.com/2008/03/

    "ROSEMARY" comes from the Latin "ros marinus", "sea-dew", possibly because it grew near the sea.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.winternet.com/~chuckg/dictionary/dictionary.158.html

    rosemary leaved


    (E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/nl/akph.htm

    2. Weird Words: "Roscid" [dt. "taufeucht"]

    Though Latin "ros", meaning "dew" or "light rain", has formed a number of English words, almost all of them have become either obsolete or so rare that you will seek them in vain in dictionaries.

    "Roscid", for example, means "dewy":
    ...
    "Rorid" also means "dewy", deriving from "ror-", the inflected form of "ros". So does "rore" (with its adjective "roral"). "Rore" is even rarer than the others, now known solely because Shakespeare used it in Timon of Athens ("My words neither aspersed or inspersed with the flore or rore of eloquence.") Others from the same source include "roriferous", "bringing or bearing dew", and "rorigenous", "produced by dew". This last word seems to have appeared nowhere else but Nathan Bailey's Dictionarium Britannicum of 1730. The final item in this dusty exhibit of unloved lexicography is "irrorate", "to bedew or sprinkle with dew".

    Another descendent of "ros" that's still in use is "rosolio", a sweet cordial of Italy which is sold commercially under brand names such as Cinzano and Martini. That name is an alteration of "ros solis", "the dew of the sun", not as a highfalutin romantic name but because in its early days one ingredient was the juice of the sundew plant. Later it became "rosa solis", "rose of the sun", because rose petals were substituted for sundew.

    Confusion between "ros" and "rosa" has been endemic: "rosa solis" was also at one time the name of some species of sundew. And, though few know it, the plant called "rosemary" derives its name not from the "rose" but from the "dew"; its Latin name was "ros marinus", "sea dew", because its natural habitat is sea cliffs.


    (E?)(L?) https://www.yourdictionary.com/rosemary

    Rosemary


    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=rosemary
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Engl. "rosemary" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1610 auf.

    Erstellt: 2019-06

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