Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Etruskologie, Etruscología, Étruscologie, Etruscologia, Etruscology

A

Anthony (W3)

Der Name tschech. "Antonín", dt. "Anton", (fem. dt. "Antonia"), span. "Antonio", weibl. frz. "Antoinette", ital. "Antonio", engl. "Anthony", (Kurzformen: "Tony", "Tonya"), lat. "Antonius", geht auf einen altrömischen Geschlechternamen zurück und könnte weiter auf griech. "anthos", "ánthos" = dt. "Blüte" zurück gehen (was aber stark bezweifelt wird),(wurde wahrscheinlich volksetymologisch assoziiert). Es wird vermutet, dass es sich um eine Übernahme aus dem Etruskischen handelt.

"Anthony": possibly "priceless" (Greek) or "flower" from Greek anthos but most likely of unknown Etruscan origin. From a Roman family name. Mark Anthony was a Roman general.

(E?)(L?) http://www.babynamewizard.com/baby-name/boy/anthony

Origin of the name "Anthony":

Derived from the Latin "Antonius", an old Roman family name of unknown etymology. "Priceless" and "of inestimable worth" are popular folk definitions of the name.

Var: "Anton", "Antonio". Short: "Toni", "Tonio", "Tony".
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(E?)(L?) http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=antonius


(E?)(L?) http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=anthony
"Antoni" ist die kat. Form von "Antonius".

Weitere Namen, die mit "Antonius" und "Anthony" - in verschiedenen Sprachen - zusammenhängen sind: "Anakoni", "Anchjo", "Andoni", "Antal", "Antanas", "Ante", "Antía", "Anto", "Antoine", "Antón", "Anton", "Antonella", "Antonello", "Antónia", "Antonia", "Antonie", "Antonino", "António", "Antonio", "Antonius", "Antono", "Antony", "Antton", "Antun", "Tóni", "Tony" und der Familienname "Anthonyson".

(E?)(L?) http://www.cbgfamilienamen.nl/nfb/




(E?)(L?) https://www.dastelefonbuch.de/Suche/Anthony

"Anthony" im Telefonbuch


(E?)(L?) http://dmnes.org/name/Anthony

Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources

"Anthony" m. Latin Antonius, a Roman gens. The gens may itself be of Etruscan origin.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Anthony

"Anthony", masc. proper name, from Latin "Antonius", name of a Roman gens (with unetymological "-h-" probably suggested by many Greek loan words beginning "anth-", such as "anthros" "flower", "anthropos" "man").

"St. Anthony" (4c.), Egyptian hermit, was patron saint of swineherds, to whom one of each litter was usually vowed, hence "Anthony" for "smallest pig of the litter" (1660s; in condensed form "tantony pig" from 1590s). "St. Anthony's Fire" (1520s), popular name for erysipelas, is said to be so called from the tradition that those who sought his intercession recovered from that distemper during a fatal epidemic in 1089.


(E?)(L?) http://www.kunigunde.ch/HMA.htm#gnAnton

"Anton"

ursprünglich ein römischer Familienname, wahrscheinlich etruskischer Herkunft

verbreitet in Deutschland durch die Verehrung des heiligen Antonius von Padua, dem Schutzpatron von Portugal (13. Jh.) Varianten: "Anton", "Toni", "Anthony", "Antoine", "Antonio", "Tonio", "Tony", "Antonius"
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(E?)(L?) http://www.meilleursprenoms.com/prenom.php/Anthony

"ANTHONY"

Origine et sens : "inestimable" (latin), "fleur" (grec).

Autres prénoms associés

"Andon", "Andoni", "Anthonny", "Antoine", "Antolin", "Anton", "Antone", "Antonello", "Antoni", "Antòni", "Antonie", "Antonien", "Antonin", "Antonino", "Antonio", "Antony", "Antton", "Anttoni", "Thony", "Titouan", "Toni", "Tonin", "Tonino", "Tonio", "Tonny", "Tony"
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(E?)(L?) https://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Anthony

"Anthony", Male Name

Usage: Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic

Origin and Meaning: English form of "Antonius"
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(E?)(L?) https://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Antonius

"Antonius", Male Name

Usage: Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Norwegian

Origin and Meaning

Roman nomen Related Names


(E?)(L?) http://www.oocities.org/edgarbook/names/az/anthony.html

"Anthony"

Etymology: "Anthony" is the modern English form of an Ancient Greek name, "Antony". It original meaning is unknown, but it could be "Flowering" from "anther" ("flower"), or "Priceless", or "Beyond Praise".

The popularity of early saints like "St. Anthony the Great" and "St. Anthony of Padua" led to "Anthony" being fairly common in England from the 12th century on. From the 12th century until the 17th century, the name was commonly spelled "Antony", less the "h". However, a revived interest in the Greek language led to the assumption that "Antony" was derived from the word "anther" and the spelling was “corrected” by adding an "h".




(E?)(L?) http://www.orbilat.com/Romance_Onomastics/Personal/Romance/Frame.html




(E?)(L?) http://www.sacklunch.net/personalnames/A/AntonyAnthony.html

"Antony", "Anthony"

"Antony", "Anthony": From Latin "Antonius", meaning "inestimable". According to Littleton, the Antonian family were descended from "Antius", son of Hercules.


(E?)(L?) http://www.searchforancestors.com/surnames/origin/a/anthony.php

"Anthony" Surname Origin

(Latin) Hercules-descended. "Antius", a son of Hercules. The inserted "-h-" is probably due to the Dut. from "Anthonius".
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(E?)(L?) http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Anthony

Variations:

"Andy", "Antal", "Anthone", "Anthoney", "Anntoin", "Antin", "Antoine", "Anton", "Antone", "Antonello", "Antoney", "Antoni", "Antonije", "Antonin", "Antonine", "Antonino", "Antonio", "Antonius", "Antons", "Antony", "Antun", "Antuwan", "Antwahn", "Antwohn", "Antwon", "Antwuan", "Teunis", "Thonus", "Toney", "Toni", "Tony", "Twan"

SEE ALSO "Anfernee", "Danton"

OTHER FORM VIA "ANTON", "TONY", "Andon"

FEMININE FORMS "Antoinette", "Antonia"


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/




(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/anthony

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"Anthony": a masculine name: dim. "Tony"; var. "Antony"; equiv. L. "Antonius", It. & Sp. "Antonio", Fr. "Antoine", Ger. & Russ. "Anton"; fem. "Antonia"

Origin of Anthony: with unhistoric "-h-" from Classical Latin "Antonius", name of a Roman gens

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(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Anthony
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Anthony" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1510 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2018-02

April (W3)

Der Monatsname dt. "April", engl. "April" könnte auch auf eine etruskischen Bezeichnung für die griechische Göttin "Aphrodite" zurück gehen.

(E?)(L?) https://www.dailywritingtips.com/the-eponymy-family/

April: The name came from an Etruscan word associated with Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love and beauty.


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm

"April": the month of "Venus", Roman version of Gk "Aphrodite" (perh. through Etruscan version "Apru")


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=April
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "April" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1520 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#April

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2018-01

B

bbc.co.uk
Etruscan Antefix

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/mO_dgY4cSOK3eavZGOA8YQ

Etruscan Antefix

Contributed by Norman Sanders

An antefix is a terracotta object placed along a house gutter to hold a row of tiles above it. This one is decorated with the head of a young man. It is in mint condition. It had been buried for nearly three thousand years and still bears traces of the soil. It tells me that the Etruscans spent a lot of effort decorating their houses, and had a deep appreciation of civic beauty. It was evidently made, as one of many, on a very early production line. This would have given a pleasing effect of uniformity along the house gutter. Since this was a cheap method of production, it tells us that economics was an important consideration even in those days.


Erstellt: 2018-02

bbc.co.uk
Etruscan Bronze Carafe

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/zD8vT13cR02xhWG0abXQcA

Etruscan Bronze Carafe

Contributed by Norman Sanders

I found this in a dried up Etruscan water tunnel below the foundation of a Roman villa. It was one item in a heap of Etruscan rubbish thrown into the tunnel by the Romans during the building of their villa, the hole being plugged by a large amphora. It struck me that the Romans had no interest or respect for historical artifacts. The site was high on an isolated hilltop commanding a beautiful panorama of the hills north of Rome. Clearly the Etruscans and the Romans had the same feelings for landscape as modern Italians, who were building a new villa on the site. Making this discovery was the most exciting thing that has ever happened to me! I stopped breathing!


Erstellt: 2018-02

bbc.co.uk
Etruscan black figure vase

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/quvUWsRBSgGtf7jVqmK5rA

Etruscan black figure vase

Contributed by Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology

This Etruscan vase has been subject to many interpretations in the past. It is decorated in the black-figure technique that originated in the Greek city of Corinth, but was adapted throughout Greece and beyond in the 6th century BC. When the Ure Museum acquired it, in 1947, this amphora, meaning a jug carried from both sides, was taken to be a 'Pontic' creation. 'Pontic' refers to the Black Sea area. Through analysis of the clay, however, scholars have since determined that this pot was not made in the East but in the West, namely in Etruria. The Museum's founder, Percy Ure, interpreted the figures on the top part of the vase, at least, as telling the story of Troilos, the Trojan Prince who was ambushed by the Greek hero Achilles at a fountainhouse, to which he had escorted his sister, Polyxena, to fetch water. Professor Brian Sparkes has recently suggested, however, that on one side of the vase we see the Thracian king Rhesus, who came to the aid of the Trojans, only to be killed by Odysseus and Diomedes, Greek heroes who raided his camp while he and his men slept. As yet, there is no proof which of these two stories was intended by the unnamed painter of this amphora.


Erstellt: 2018-02

bbc.co.uk
Etruscan pottery wine jug

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/4pu9k0raS0yZMRpNZmwAcA

Greek/Etruscan pottery wine jug

Contributed by Anthony Brown

This wine jug (oinochoe) would have been used by everyday people across the Ancient Greek World. Found in Italy it was probably and Etruscan copy of a Greek original or it may have been an import from Attica (mainland Greece) itself. Either way it shows how Greek civilisation (and therefore Greek philosophy, thinking and culture) had spread across large areas of Europe.

The jug itself is of black-glazed pottery and although an everyday item it still shows a careful degree of attention with a small sculpted head of a god on the handle and the decorative striping on the lower half that represent the woven basket that was used to protect larger vessels like amphorae, and which can still be seen on bottles of Chianti to this day.


Erstellt: 2018-02

bbc.co.uk
Etruscan votive bronze of the God Laran

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/j0gZPy93Sx6bKPn_r7cFOA

Etruscan votive bronze of the God Laran

Contributed by R W Traves Parkinson

Etruscan votive bronze of the God Laran

For clarification this is an object I own. It is part of the Traves Parkinson Collection - R W Traves Parkinson. This votive of the Etruscan God Laran was made in about 400BC. It was the Lar Familiaris or household God and would have been the centrepiece of the household shrine of an Etruscan family. The Lar Familiaris in the family shrine represented the spirits of the ancestors of the family. This particular bronze was found in a field near York and may have come to Britain in the rucksack of a Roman Legionary. The ninth legion raised by Julius Caesar in 58 BC was also based in York for more than 50 years. The ninth marched out of York in 117 AD to drive the Picts back into Scotland. The legend is that they marched north deep into the Grampian Mountains in full array but never returned, being lost to history in the mists of Scotland. Perhaps a member of the ill fated legion hid his treasured family heirloom before marching north, in order to keep it safe? Perhaps he was haunted by premonitions of the legions fate and hoped that either he or one of his comrades would return to reclaim the sacred image; but alas no one returned


Erstellt: 2018-02

Bonfante, Larissa (W3)

Larissa Bonfante (27.03.1931, Neapel, Italien - ) lehrte an der New York University und machte sich einen Namen als Kennerin der etruskischen Sprache und Kultur.

Literatur:

(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larissa_Bonfante

Larissa Bonfante (born March 27, 1931, in Naples, Italy) is an Italian-American classicist, Professor of Classics emerita at New York University and an authority on Etruscan language and culture.

Born in Naples, a daughter of professor Giuliano Bonfante, Bonfante studied fine arts and classics at Barnard College, earning her B.A. in 1954; she completed her M.A. in classics from the University of Cincinnati in 1957 and her Ph.D. in art history and archaeology at Columbia University in 1966. She studied at Columbia with Otto Brendel. Bonfante received the Gold Medal Award for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement in 2007 from the Archaeological Institute of America.
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(E?)(L?) 0-www.worldcat.org.novacat.nova.edu/identities/lccn-n79100486/

Bonfante, Larissa - Overview

Works: 67 works in 289 publications in 7 languages and 5,799 library holdings

Genres: Chronologies History Conference papers and proceedings Catalogs Periodicals

Roles: Author, Editor, Other, Translator, Contributor

Most widely held works by Larissa Bonfante


Erstellt: 2018-02

britannica.com
Etruscan language

(E?)(L?) https://www.britannica.com/topic/Etruscan-language

"Etruscan language", language isolate spoken by close neighbours of the ancient Romans. The Romans called the "Etruscans" "Etrusci" or "Tusci"; in Greek they were called "Tyrsenoi" or "Tyrrhenoi"; in Umbrian and Italic language their name can be found in the adjective "turskum". The Etruscans’ name for themselves was "rasna" or "rasna".
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The Etruscan alphabet

"Etruscan" is written in an alphabet probably derived from one of the Greek alphabets. It is of very great importance that "Etruscan" is written in a recognizable alphabet related to the Greek and Semitic because sound values can be assigned with some degree of precision to each symbol. "Etruscan writing" proceeded from right to left and in earliest times had no word division or punctuation. In about the 6th century bc a system of points, or dots, consisting of four, three, or two dots inscribed vertically, was introduced to mark word boundaries and, in some instances, apparently, to indicate syllables and possibly abbreviations.
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Grammatical characteristics
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Vocabulary

Since the language is undeciphered, meaning can be assigned with certainty to only a few Etruscan words that occur very frequently in the texts. Some kinship terms are sure — among these are Less certain but probably correct are words designating members of the larger societal organization: A pair of dice certainly have on them the names of the numbers from one through six. Although the order of these numbers has been and still is disputed, the arrangement most generally accepted is this:

Among the continuing mysteries of Etruscan are the reasons why the Etruscans left no written records of their great civilization other than inscriptions and occasional texts and why the Romans, who knew the Etruscans intimately, transmitted little or nothing to posterity about either Etruscan literature or their language, which must certainly have been spoken, or at least preserved, by some families in Rome long after the period of Etruscan greatness had passed.


Erstellt: 2018-02

C

christianlehmann.eu
Etruscan

(E?)(L?) http://www.christianlehmann.eu/ling/sprachen/languages_antiquity/etruscan/etr_index.html

Etruscan

Christian Lehmann

Universität Erfurt

Languages of antiquity

I. Specimina from corpus II. Language description III. Comments on description
IV. References




(E?)(L?) http://www.christianlehmann.eu/ling/sprachen/languages_antiquity/etruscan/etr_index.html

2.2.2. Lexicon

A certain portion of the Etruscan lexicon is known by now. The table contains some basic vocabulary.

kinship persons objects abstract


Erstellt: 2018-02

D

dafont.com
Etruscan Font

(E?)(L?) https://www.dafont.com/etruscan.font

Etruscan by Dave Bastian


Erstellt: 2018-02

E

Etruscan (W3)

Die "Etrusker", engl. "Etruscans", die zwischen den beiden Flüssen Arno und Tiber siedelten sollen dem Wasser ihren Namen verdanken.

The modern "Tuscany" — together with part of neighboring Umbria — comprises the ancient country of "Etruria". Much "Etrurian" (or "Etruscan") history remains shadowy, but we do know this: although linguists cannot be certain about the affiliation of the Etruscan language (Indo-European or not?), the Etruscan alphabet — derived from the Greek alphabet — most definitely did develop into the source of our familiar Latin alphabet.

The word "Tuscan" was once synonymous with "Etruscan"; "Etruscan" is another way of saying "Tuscan brown". "Tuscan brown" is applied to a moderate to reddish brown darker than a pencilwood — that is also known by another place-name, the Middle Eastern "Mecca". Don’t confuse "Tuscan brown" with "Tuscan tan" though: "Tuscan tan" names the light brown that is redder, stronger, and slightly darker than cork and that is also known by the French place-name "sauterne".

As we shade toward the reds, we come to "Tuscan red", a moderate reddish brown yellower and deeper than a roan and redder, slightly darker, and much stronger than mahogany. "Tuscan red" is also known as madder "Indian red" and "mascara".

The Roman alphabet or Latin alphabet was adapted from an Etruscan alphabet, to represent the phonemes of the Latin language. The Etruscans, in turn, had taken their alphabet from the Greeks, who adapted it from the Phoenicians.


"Etruscan" als Farbe: - #712f26 - Etruscan
"Etruscan" als Farbe: - #673923 - Etruscan
"Etruscan Red" als Farbe: - #b85d43 - Etruscan Red
"Etruscan Red" als Farbe: - #8c4743 - Etruscan Red



Literatur:


The Etruscans were a people who lived in central Italy. Their state was a federation of cities, and included areas such as Etruria, Latium and Campania. They also founded Rome. Latium separated somewhere around 500 BC, soon followed by Rome and other cities. The Etruscans lost their independence in the 4th century BC and were assimilated in the Roman Republic in 265 BC. However, their influence remained in Roman culture (laws, architecture, sacral acts, etc.).



Before the days of ancient Rome's greatness, Italy was the home of a nation called "Etruria", whose people we call the "Etruscans". Its civilization prospered between 950 and 300 BCE. in northwestern Italy — in a region between the Arno River (which runs through Pisa and Florence) and the Tiber (which runs through Rome). These people rose to prosperity and power, then disappeared, leaving behind many unanswered questions concerning their origin and their culture. Because little Etruscan literature remains and the language of inscriptions on their monuments has been only partially deciphered, scholars have gained most of their knowledge of the Etruscans from studying the remains of their buildings, monuments, vast tombs, and the objects they left behind, notably bronze and terra cotta sculptures and polychrome ceramics.

Among theories about the Etruscans' origins are the possibilities that they migrated from Greece, or from somewhere beyond Greece. Perhaps they traveled down from the Alps. Or, as their pre-Indo-European language might suggest, they may have been a people indiginous to today's Tuscany who suddenly acquired the tools for rapid development. The uncertainty is held unresolved.

Theirs was an area of good farmland, forests and mineral resources, all of which the Etruscans exploited skillfully. In time, they became traders, their mariners often doubling up as pirates. And as wealth grew, a social pecking order followed, with a powerful aristocracy living in stone palaces and their serfs occupying wooden huts.

Theirs was not, however, a centralized society dominated by a single leader or a single imperial city. Rather, towns and hill-top villages (many of which survive to this day, albeit with few traces of their Etruscan origins) appear to have enjoyed considerable autonomy. But they spoke the same language, which also existed in a written form. Further, their religious rituals, military practices and social customs were largely similar. For their Greek contemporaries and Roman successors, the Etruscans were clearly a different ethnic group.

Cremation and the burial of ashes in clay urns was a common practice in this area before the advent of the Etruscan era. Among the objects we have that tell us much about the Etruscans are their cinerary urns.


(E?)(L?) https://www.britannica.com/topic/Etruscan

"Etruscan", member of an ancient people of Etruria, Italy, between the Tiber and Arno rivers west and south of the Apennines, whose urban civilization reached its height in the 6th century bce. Many features of Etruscan culture were adopted by the Romans, their successors to power in the peninsula.
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(E?)(L?) http://xml.coverpages.org/unicodeTR3.html

Etruscan

The "Etruscan" script is used to write both the Etruscan and Oscan (or Oscan-Umbrian) languages. "Etruscan" was the language of a people (who called themselves "rasna") in "Etruria", corresponding to modern "Tuscany" in western Italy. The Etruscan civilization lived alongside the Romans and there was much contact between the two. Inscriptions in Etruscan date from about the 7th century BC through the first century AD. The Etruscan and Oscan languages are unrelated, Oscan being an Italic language similar to Latin and Etruscan being imperfectly known and of uncertain linguistic affiliation.

"Etruscan" is written horizontally from right to left (occasionally boustrophedon). Archaic inscriptions have no spaces between words, but later inscriptions frequently have single or double dots between words. The letters "ii" and "uu" are used in Oscan but not in Etruscan.

The letters "s" and "o" (0E and 0F) appear in Etruscan inscriptions only in the context of abecedaries and were apparently not used in writing the Etruscan language.

Etruscan numerals are imperfectly known. They are similar to Roman numerals, but they are read and written from right to left, in contrast to Latin. The numerals at 26 and 27 are uncertain.

Issues: The numerals are too uncertain at this time to warrant a final encoding; more information is necessary.

Some Sources


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/etruscan

Etruscan ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Etruscan

"Etruscan" (n.): 1706, from Latin "Etruscus" "an Etruscan", from "Etruria", ancient name of "Tuscany" (see "Tuscan"); of uncertain origin but containing an element that might mean "water" (see "Basque") and which could be a reference to the rivers in the region.


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Basque

Basque

1817 (adj.), 1835 (n.), from French, from Spanish "vasco" (adj.), from "vascon" (n.), from Latin "Vascones" ("Vasconia" was the Roman name for the up-country of the western Pyrenees), said by von Humboldt to originally mean "foresters" but more likely a Latinized version of the people's name for themselves, "euskara" or "eskuara".

This contains a basic element "-sk-" which is believed to relate to maritime people or sailors, and which is also found in the name of the "Etruscans" .... [Room, "Placenames of the World," 2006]

Earlier in English was "Basquish" (1610s, noun and adjective); "Baskles" (plural noun, late 14c.); "Baskon" (mid-15c.).


(E?)(L?) https://www.linotype.com/de/383/etruscan-schriftfamilie.html

Etruscan™ Schriftfamilie

Entworfen von Timothy Donaldson (1995)


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Etruscan

Limericks on "Etruscan"


(E?)(L?) http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735370.timeline.0001

c. 750 BCE: The Etruscans establish Italy's first civilization, in the region between the Arno and the Tiber


(E?)(L?) http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735387.timeline.0001




(E?)(L?) http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735400.timeline.0001

396 BCE: The Romans capture the nearby Etruscan town of Veii, beginning a long process of territorial expansion


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue065.html

...
... the Etruscan language has been deciphered (cf. Giuliano & Larissa Bonfante's book on the subject), but the problem is that there are few texts lengthy enough to say much about its structure other than that its apparently not Indo-European. There are hundreds of examples of inscriptions that can be translated into simple sentences such as "This cup belongs to Larth son of Larth."
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(E?)(L?) https://lrc.la.utexas.edu/eieol/latol

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The Latin alphabet was taken over from the Greek through Etruscan. The order of the letters is therefore much the same as in Greek, as is also true of most of their pronunciation. The 23-letter alphabet is as follows:

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T V X Y Z
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/




(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/etruscan

"Etruscan" of "Etruria" or its people, language, or culture

Origin of Etruscan: from Classical Latin "Etruscus" from uncertain or unknown; perhaps Etruscan an unverified form "etrsco-".

Also "Etrurian"
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Etruscan
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Etruscan" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1710 / 1790 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2018-01

Etruscan calf
Etruscan style (W3)

Die (buchbinderischen) Bezeichnungen engl. "Etruscan calf" bzw. engl. "Etruscan style" beziehen sich auf die etruskischen Vasen, deren Dekoration und Farbe dem verwendeten Kalbsleder ähnelt.


"Etruscan" als Farbe: - #712f26 - Etruscan
"Etruscan" als Farbe: - #673923 - Etruscan
"Etruscan Red" als Farbe: - #b85d43 - Etruscan Red
"Etruscan Red" als Farbe: - #8c4743 - Etruscan Red



(E?)(L?) http://cool.conservation-us.org/don/dt/dt1218.html

Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books

A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology

Etruscan calf ( Etruscan style )

A method of decorating calfskin bindings by acid staining, so called because of the contrasting colors or shades of leather (light brown or terra cotta) in conjunction with dark brown or black tooling. The terra cotta shades and decoration represent Greek and Etruscan vases. Etruscan bindings usually have a rectangular panel on each cover, or, occasionally, a plain oval with a classical urn in the center. They are tooled in black, surrounded by a border of Greek palmate leaves, which are also in black. and with outer borders of classical design (Grecian key or Doric entablature) tooled in gold. The spines are also decorated with classical ornaments.

Many 19th century authorities attributed this style to John Whitaker: however, it seems more likely that it was the creation of WilliamEDWARDS OF HALIFAX .

There appears to be no very conclusive evidence as to the origin of the style, but it is known that Edwards employed it at an early date, circa 1785. It was popular during the period 1785-1820. (69 , 94 , 97 , 158 , 280 )


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=???
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "???" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr ???? / nicht signifikant auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2018-02

Etruscan Venus Surface (W3)

Die Bezeichnung "Etruscan Venus Surface" bezieht sich auf eine mathematische Kostruktion im 4-dimensionalen Raum. Wieso diese Form an eine "Etruskische Venus" erinnern soll, wissen wohl nur Mathematiker.

(E?)(L?) http://mathworld.wolfram.com/EtruscanVenusSurface.html

Etruscan Venus Surface

A three-dimensional shadow of a four-dimensional "Klein bottle".

SEE ALSO: Ida Surface, Klein Bottle
...


(E?)(L?) http://mathworld.wolfram.com/KleinBottle.html

The "Klein bottle" is a closed nonorientable surface of Euler characteristic 0 (Dodson and Parker 1997, p. 125) that has no inside or outside, originally described by "Felix Klein" (Hilbert and Cohn-Vossen 1999, p. 308). It can be constructed by gluing both pairs of opposite edges of a rectangle together giving one pair a half-twist, but can be physically realized only in four dimensions, since it must pass through itself without the presence of a hole. Its topology is equivalent to a pair of cross-caps with coinciding boundaries (Francis and Weeks 1999). It can be represented by connecting the side of a square in the orientations illustrated in the right figure above (Gardner 1984, pp. 15-17; Gray 1997, pp. 323-324).

It can be cut in half along its length to make two Möbius strips (Dodson and Parker 1997, p. 88), but can also be cut into a single Möbius strip (Gardner 1984, pp. 14 and 17).

The above picture is an immersion of the "Klein bottle" in (three-space). There is also another possible immersion called the "figure-8" immersion (Apéry 1987, Gray 1997, Geometry Center). While Gray (1997) depicts this embedding using the eight curve (aka. lemniscate of Gerono), it can also be constructed using the usual (Bernoulli) lemniscate (Pinkall 1985, Apéry 1987).
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=???
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "???" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr ???? / nicht signifikant auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2018-02

europeana.eu
Results for Etruscan

(E?)(L?) https://www.europeana.eu/portal/de/search?q=Etruscan

1 - 12 von 679 Ergebnissen zu "Etruscan"


Erstellt: 2018-02

F

February (W3)

Dt. "Februar", engl. "February" könnte auch auf den etruskischen Gott "Februus", den Herrscher der Unterwelt, verweisen.

(E?)(L?) https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2012/01/03/time-of-the-season/

January 3, 2012 by Lucy Ferriss

Time of the Season

January arrives, looking forward and back. That’s Janus, god of gates and doors, beginnings and endings. As we pass through the portal into 2012, let’s linger for a moment on Old Double-Face, along with the panoply, not only of mythic figures but also of linguistic traditions, that informs the ways in which we refer to time.

January’s easy, but as soon as we leave his forward-looking visage we run into trouble. February might be named for the Etruscan (i.e., pre-Roman) god Februus, who ruled the underworld (and February can sure get gloomy); it could also be named for the Roman Februa festival of purification (februare, “to purge”). Since February was the last month in the Roman calendar, both purification and remembrance of the dead make sense.

Things get simple again with March—first month of the Roman year, god of war, might as well start the year off with some good old-fashioned hostilities. Not to mention how it comes in like a lion. April may come from aperire, “to open,” which makes sense for daffodils, but you’ll also find proponents of Aphrodite, goddess of beauty, as the month’s source. That may work south of the Mason-Dixon line. Talk to anyone in New England about mud season, and they would prefer to assign beauty to May—which, suitably for everyone, is named for Maia, goddess of growth, the earth, spring, and bunny rabbits.

But wait. The next month, June, may be named for Juno, but it may also come from iuniores, young men—as opposed to maiores, the old men who preceded them in the month of (you guessed it) May.

So much for gods and Etruscans. The mourners of Julius marked his assassination by renaming what was then the fifth month (Quintilus) July; and Augustus raised them one by renaming the sixth month (Sextilis) August because some lucky things apparently happened to him right about then. (He also stole that extra day from February, but that’s another story.) Thereafter, imagination runs dry. We get seventh, eighth, ninth, and tenth months—September, October, November, December—in quick succession, with no one offering to rename them according to their current configuration because after all, who wants November to start before Labor Day?

Once curiosity kicks in about timekeeping, it’s hard to stop. Days of the week, for instance. Why, having hung out with the Romans for month-naming, do we suddenly switch to Norse Gods? Well, we don’t switch entirely. There being seven days to the week is the result of much calendar-tinkering and also of the Romans’ awareness of seven heavenly bodies—Sun, Moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn. (The Greeks didn’t bother with weeks, thus missing out on long weekends and TGIF.) We kept the sun and Saturn for our weekend days, and as worship of the sun gained in ascendancy among pre-Christian Romans, Sunday took its place as the first day of the week—a place, you may note, that it’s gradually losing as some calendars place Monday in that spot.

Frigga, ready to party

Monday is a straight Teutonic translation, “moon” for “luna.” Tyr, who inspired “Tuesday,” is the Viking god of war, equivalent to Mars. (We keep the French form when we refer to Mardi Gras.) Wednesday, Woden’s day, substitutes a much bigger deity for the Roman messenger god Mercury: Woden, or Odin, was the main guy in Norse mythology, the equivalent of Jupiter, who originally got the next day, preserved in French as jeudi but switched for English purposes to Thor’s day, or Thursday. Friday, originally assigned to the Roman goddess of beauty, finds its English origin in Frigga, Norse goddess of fertility, who is often depicted as, well, generous in her proportions. Now that’s an improvement, at least if you don’t want dieting to get in the way of a good launch to the weekend.

We’ll stop there, before we get to the various debates over season-naming, the origins of fortnights or ides, why we refer to the second day instead of the twoth day, or the ill luck of Friday the 13th. Happy New Year!


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=February
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "February" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1520 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#February

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2018-01

fescennine (W3)

Engl. "fescennine" = dt. "feszenninisch", "schlüpfrig", "zotig" geht zurück auf den Namen der etruskischen Stadt "Fescennia". Dort soll es üblich gewesen sein, zu Gelegenheiten wie Ernte und Hochzeiten etwas freiere Lieder zu singen.

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20041231121045/http://16.1911encyclopedia.org:80/F/FE/FESCENNINE_VERSES.htm

"FESCENNIA", an ancient city of Etruria, which is probably to be placed immediately to the N. of the modern Corchiano, 6 m. N.W. of Civita Castellana (see FALERII). The Via Amerina traverses it. G. Dennis (Cities and Cemeteries of Etruria, London, 1883, i. 115 proposed to I) lace it at the Riserva S. Silvestro, walls exist. At Corchiano itself, however, similar walls may be traced, and the site is a strong and characteristic onea triangle between two deep ravines, with the third (west) side cut off by a ditch. Here, too, remains of two bridges may be seen, and several rich tombs have been excavated.

See A. Buglione, Conte di i\Ionale, in Römische Mitteilungen (1887), p. 21 seq.

"FESCENNINE VERSES" ("Fescennina carmina"), one of the earliest kinds of Italian poetry, subsequently developed into the Satura and the Roman comic drama. Originally sung at village harvest-home rejoicings, they made their way into the towns, and became the fashion at religious festivals and private gatherings especially weddings, to which in later times they were practically restricted. They were usually in the Saturnian metre and took the form of a dialogue, consisting of an interchange of extemporaneous raillery. Those who took part in them wore masks made of the bark of trees. At first harmless and good-humoured, if somewhat coarse, these songs gradually outstripped the bounds of decency; malicious attacks were made upon both gods and men, and the matter became so serious that the law intervened and scurrilous personalities were forbidden by the Twelve Tables (Cicero, De re publica, iV. 10). Specimens of the "Fescennines" used at weddings are the Epithalamium of Manlius (Catullus, lxi. 122) and the four poems of Claudian in honor of the marriage of Honorius and Maria; the first, however, is distinguished by a licentiousness which is absent in the lafter. Ausonius in his Cento nuptialis mentions the "Fescennines" of Annianus Faliscus, who lived in the time of Hadrian. Various derivations have been proposed for "Fescennine". According to Festus, they were introduced from "Fescennia" in Etruria, but there is no reason to assume that any particular town was specially devoted to the use of such songs. As an alternative Festus suggests a connection with "fascinum", either because the "Fescennina" were regarded as a protection against evil influences (see Munro, Criticisms and Elucidations of Catullus, p. 76) or because "fascinum" (= "phallus"), as the symbol of fertility, would from early times have been naturally associated with harvest festivals.

H. Nettleship, in an article on The Earliest Italian Literature (Journal of Philology, xi. 1882), in support of Munros view, translates the expression verses used by charmers, assuming a noun "fescennus", connected with fas fan.

The locus classicus in ancient literature is - Horace, Epistles, ii. 1. 139; see also Virgil, Georgics, ii. 385; Tibullus ii. I. 55; E. Hoffmann, Die Fescenninen, in Rheinisches Museum, Ii. p. 320 (1896); art. LATINLITERATUiIE.


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/F1.html

Fescennine Verses


(E?)(L?) http://outils.biblissima.fr/fr/collatinus-web/

Fescennia, ae, f. : Fescennie (ville d'Etrurie).

Fescenninicola, ae : qui aime les poésies fescennines.

Fescenninus, a, um : de la ville de Fescennie, fescennin. Fescennium, ii, n. (= Fescennia) : Fescennie (ville d'Etrurie).


(E2)(L1) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/fescennine
(E?)(L?) http:///

fescennine


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Fescennine

Limericks on "Fescennine"


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/Sex-Dictionary/fescennine

"fescennine": "Licentious"; "obscene"; "lewd"

Synonyms: "bawdy"; "loose"; "Rabelaisian"; "racy"; "strong"; "unbridled"

Etymology: From the ancient Etrurian city of "Fescennia" known for its licentious poetry.


(E?)(L?) https://www.wordnik.com/words/fescennine

fescennine


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/fescennine.html

"fescennine", adjective: "Obscene" or "scurrilous".

[After "Fescennia", a town of ancient Etruria known for its ribald and scurrilous songs sung at festivals and weddings.]


(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-fen1.htm

Fescennine

Investigation of this useful, albeit extremely rare, adjective for matters considered "licentious", "obscene" or "scurrilous" was provoked by a message from Curt Weil, who pointed out that it appeared in Jim Meddick’s Monty comic strip on 8 July 2008. Monty criticises a man for seemingly talking to a dolphin, which Monty calls a fish. The dolphin responds and his interlocutor translates it: “He said, firstly: Dolphins are not fish. They are mammals. Then he said something rather unflattering and fescennine about primates.”

The word comes from the name of the ancient Etruscan town of "Fescennia", whose location isn’t known for sure, though it was somewhere near Civita Castellana or Corchiano in the modern region of Lazio in central Italy. Like many rural communities, it had a tradition of ribald and "scurrilous" songs that were performed at festivals such as harvest-home and weddings. These could be in the form of extempore verses that were aimed at another member of the company, who was expected to respond in kind.

The Romans took over the idea, applying it particularly to bawdy verses sung to the happy couple at their nuptials, though later the "fescennine" verses were cleaned up and made more urbane and sophisticated.


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/worldwidewords/2008-August/000492.html

2. Weird Words: Fescennine

"Licentious", "obscene", "scurrilous".

Investigation of this useful, albeit extremely rare, adjective was provoked by a message from Curt Weil, pointing out that it appeared in Jim Meddick's Monty comic strip on 8 July 2008. Monty criticises a man for seemingly talking to a dolphin, which Monty calls a fish. The dolphin responds and his interlocutor translates it: "He said, firstly: Dolphins are not fish. They are mammals. Then he said something rather unflattering and fescennine about primates."

The word is a toponym, named after the ancient Etruscan town of "Fescennia", on the River Tiber in modern Tuscany. Like many rural communities, it had a tradition of ribald and "scurrilous" songs that were performed at festivals such as harvest-home and weddings. These could be in the form of extempore verses that were aimed at another member of the company, who was expected to respond in kind.
...
FESCENNINE Several readers, better informed about the geography of Italy than I am, have pointed out that the Etruscan town Fescinnia that's the source of this word can't be in Tuscany, where I put it. Though nobody seems to know its location for certain, it's usually taken to be near either Civita Castellana or Corchiano, which are in the Lazio region.


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/fescennine

Fescennine


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=fescennine
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "fescennine" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1640 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#fescennine

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2018-01

G

H

Haruspex (W3)

Dt. "Haruspex", frz. "Haruspice", engl., lat. "Haruspex" = dt. "Eingeweideschauer" setzt sich zusammen aus einem etwas unklaren lat. "haruga" = dt. "Opfer" und lat. "specere" = dt. "schauen", "sehen", "beobachten", "beachten". Damit bedeut lat. "haruspex" = wörtlich dt. "Opferschauer".

Von einigen Autoren wird für den ersten Wortteil von lat. "haruspex" auch eine Wurzel ide. "*ghere-" = dt. "Darm", ("Darmsaite"), "Eingeweide", postuliert.

A "haruspex" is a diviner in ancient Rome basing his predictions on inspection of the entrails of sacrificial animals.

"Haruspex" was formed in Latin by the combination of "haru-" (which is akin to "chord-" the Greek word for "gut") and "-spex" (from the verb "specere", meaning "to look"). The ancient Romans had a number of ways of determining whether the gods approved of a particular course of action. Such divination was called "augury", and a "haruspex" was a type of "augur", an official diviner of ancient Rome. (Other augurs divined the will of the gods through slightly less gruesome means, such as observing the behavior of birds or tracking celestial phenomena.) "Haruspex", like "augur", has developed a general sense of "one who prophesies", but this use is somewhat rare.

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080630031339/http://www.bartleby.com/61/56/h0075600.html

"haruspex" also "aruspex"

NOUN: Inflected forms: pl. "haruspices" also "aruspices"

A priest in ancient Rome who practiced divination by the inspection of the entrails of animals.

ETYMOLOGY: Latin. See "gher-" in Appendix I.


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080310013804/http://www.bartleby.com:80/61/roots/IE162.html

ENTRY: "gher-"

DEFINITION:

"Gut" [dt. "Eingeweide", "Gedärme"], "entrail". Oldest form "*gher-", becoming "*gher-" in centum languages.

1. Suffixed form "*gher-no-". "yarn", from Old English "gearn", "yarn", from Germanic "*garn", "string".

2. Suffixed form "*gher-n-". "hernia", from Latin "hernia", "protruded viscus", "rupture", "hernia".

3. Suffixed o-grade form "*ghor-d-". "chord", "cord", "cordon"; "harpsichord", "hexachord", "tetrachord", from Greek "khord", "gut", "string".

4. O-grade form "*ghor-". "chorion", from Greek "khorion", "intestinal membrane", "afterbirth".

5. Possible suffixed zero-grade form "*gh-u-". "haruspex", from Latin "haruspex", "he who inspects entrails", "diviner" ("-spex", "he who sees"; see "spek-"), but perhaps borrowed from Etruscan. (Pokorny 5. her- 443.)


(E?)(L?) https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/liver-of-piacenza

Liver of Piacenza

The entire known universe of the ancient Etruscans is held inside this bronze model of a sheep’s liver.

The Palazzo Farnese is a 16th century palace-turned-museum in the northern Italian city of Piacenza. Inside is something 1,600 years older than the palace itself: a bronze model of a sheep’s liver containing the whole cosmic order known to the ancient Etruscans.

The palace was built by the Duke and Duchess of Parma in about 1550, but shouldn’t be confused with the Palazzo Farnese in Rome (there you can drop in on the French Embassy, but you won’t see an Etruscan sheep’s liver). It’s open to the public for tours of the rooms and furnishings, and they have some Botticelli and other important paintings, some friezes and frescoes, and some ancient armor and weaponry. But their prized possession is this little liver.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/81/8008.html

Haruspex (pl. haruspics)

Persons who interpreted the will of the gods by inspecting the entrails of animals offered in sacrifice (old Latin, "haruga", "a victim"; "specio", "I inspect").

Cato said, “I wonder how one haruspex can keep from laughing when he sees another.”


(E?)(L?) https://www.britannica.com/topic/Haruspices

"Haruspices", ancient Etruscan diviners, “entrail observers” whose art consisted primarily in deducing the will of the gods from the appearance presented by the entrails of the sacrificial animal, especially the liver and gallbladder of sheep. An Etruscan model liver from Piacenza survived in the 21st century. Haruspices also interpreted all portents or unusual phenomena of nature, especially thunder and lightning and unusual or monstrous births, and they prescribed the expiatory ceremonies after such events. This formed a most complicated pseudoscience, in sharp contrast to native Roman divination. The art was practiced in Rome by Etruscans, and, although of great importance especially under the early republic, it never became a part of the state religion. Under the empire there existed a collegium of 60 Haruspices; however, it was never a state priesthood but a body of salaried expert advisers. Haruspices were still active at the time of the Theodosian Code (5th century ad) and John Lydus (6th century ad).
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.dailywritingtips.com/words-for-telling-the-future/

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Romans had a specialized diviner called a "haruspex" who cut open animals and examined their entrails. This practice is called "haruspicy".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/haruspex

...
Origin of "haruspex"

1575-1585: Latin, equivalent to "haru-" (akin to "hira" "intestine"; see "chord") + "spec-" (stem of "specere" "to look at") + "-s" nominative singular ending
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.etymonline.com/word/haruspex

"haruspex" (n.)

1580s, from Latin "haruspex" (plural "haruspices") "soothsayer by means of entrails", first element from PIE root "*ghere-" "gut", "entrail"; second element from Latin "spic-" "beholding", "inspecting", from PIE "*speks" "he who sees", from root "*spek-" "to observe". The practice is Etruscan. Related: "Haruspical"; "haruspication".


(E?)(L?) https://www.infoplease.com/dictionary/brewers/haruspex

"haruspex", (pl. "haruspices"). Persons who interpreted the will of the gods by inspecting the entrails of animals offered in sacrifice (old Latin, "haruga", "a victim"; "specio", "I inspect").

Cato said, “I wonder how one haruspex can keep from laughing when he sees another.”


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2004-10-Oct.htm

"haruspex" – a priest in ancient Rome who practiced divination by the inspection of the entrails of animals

It was a "haruspex" who warned Julius Caeser, "Beware the Ides of March."

Think we today are too sophisticated for such things? Think again.

... faith healers, witches, Tarot readers, numerologists, fortune-tellers, astrologers, and other contemporary counterparts of the ancient augur, auspex, and haruspex continue to thrive as both cult and business. ... Greeley reported that 73 percent of Americans believe in miracles and 40 percent report contact with the dead, while people in other Western industrialized countries score comparably high on the "magic" scale.

– Justin Kaplan and Anne Bernays, The Language of Names: What We Call Ourselves and Why It Matters

A reader notes: The Romans felt that this was a loanword from Etruscan, but I've seen IE etymologies provided for it, but just can't remember them at the moment. The "-spex" part probably has something to do with "specio" "to look" (at, behold). Cf. the "-dex" in "judex" "judge" from "dico" "to speak", "say", "tell".


(E?)(L?) http://www.islandnet.com/~egbird/dict/h.htm

"haruspex": A person who predicts the future using entrails


(E?)(L?) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/haruspex

Definition of "haruspex", plural "haruspices": a diviner in ancient Rome basing his predictions on inspection of the entrails of sacrificial animals


(E?)(L?) http://archimedes.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/cgi-bin/archim/dict/hw?lemma=haruspex&step=entry&id=d002

"Haruspex", "harú picis", pen. corr. ab haruga nominatur, vt air Donatus.

A diuinour or soathsayer by looking in beastes bowels. Vanus haruspex. Sil. Vetus haruspex. Propert.


(E?)(L?) http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/secondary/SMIGRA*/Haruspices.html

"HARUSPICES", or "ARUSPICES", were soothsayers or diviners, who interpreted the will of the gods. They originally came to Rome from Etruria, whence haruspices were often sent for by the Romans on important occasions (Liv. XXVII.37; Cic. Cat. III.8, de Div. II.4).
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The name of "haruspex" is sometimes applied to any kind of soothsayer or prophet (Prop. III.13.59); whence Juvenal (VI.550) speaks of Armenius vel Commagenus haruspex.

The latter part of the word "haruspex" contains the root "spec"; and Donatus (ad Ter. Phorm. IV.4.28) derives the former part from "haruga", a "victim". Cf. Festus, s.v. "Harviga", and Varro, De Ling. Lat. V.98, ed. Müller. (Göttling, Gesch. der Röm. Staatsv. p213; Walter, Gesch. des Röm. Rechts, §§ 142, 770, 2nd ed.; Brissonius, De Formulis, I.29, &c.)


(E?)(L?) https://www.unrv.com/forum/topic/2505-haruspices/

...
The Etruscan civilization was a deeply religious one, and a fundamental part of of their religion was divination, the determination of the will or thoughts of the gods through a worldly medium. The most popular method of divination by the "haruspex" was that of inspection of entrails, though they also watched the world for a variety of other signs such as the flights of birds. Distinct areas of an animal's liver (usually a goat or some other small animal) related to different aspects of a particular point of question, and the condition of these areas could reveal the favor or disfavor of a thing. One great archaeological find was this "haruspex stone" which outlined the various areas important to divination, giving us a priceless glimpse into the exact formulae behind the rites. The haruspices were a college of their own much like the pontiffs or augurs of Rome, but outside the state cult, who's numbers were restricted to 60 across the known world.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.wordnik.com/words/haruspex

"haruspex"
...
Etymologies: (from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition):

Latin; see "ghere-" in Indo-European roots.


(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-har1.htm

"Haruspex"

A "haruspex" in ancient Rome was a religious official who interpreted omens by inspecting the entrails of sacrificial animals.

The "haruspices" were part of a group of seers or auguries whose official function was not so much to foretell the future as to work out whether the gods approved of some proposed course of political or military action. Nothing of importance was undertaken until the auguries had been consulted. Many omens were actively watched for, such as the flight of birds, the pecking behaviour of sacred chickens, or the sound of thunder. The Romans borrowed these techniques from their predecessors, the Etruscans.

Edward Gibbon, in "The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire", was disdainful of what he saw as the barbarous rites of the period: “Amidst the sacred but licentious crowd of priests, of inferior ministers, and of female dancers, who were dedicated to the service of the temple, it was the business of the emperor to bring the wood, to blow the fire, to handle the knife, to slaughter the victim, and, thrusting his bloody hands into the bowels of the expiring animal, to draw forth the heart or liver, and to read, with the consummate skill of an "haruspex", imaginary signs of future events. The wisest of the Pagans censured this extravagant superstition, which affected to despise the restraints of prudence and decency.”

The second part of the word is clearly from Latin "specere", "to look at", but the first part is more mysterious; it may be related to Sanskrit "hir", an "artery". The technique is called "haruspicy". Another word for it is "extispicy", a word whose the first element we do know the origin of — it’s from Latin "exta", "entrails".


(E?)(L?) https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/wwftd/conversations/messages/102

the worthless word for the day is: "haruspicy"

from L. "Haruspex", the title of a lower order of priests who performed the act

divination from the entrails of sacrificial animals (see "extispicy")

"I wonder how one haruspex can keep from laughing when he sees another." - Cato (the Roman Censor)


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Haruspex
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Haruspex" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1720 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2018-02

historyofenglishpodcast
Etruscans, Romans and a Modified Alphabet

(E?)(L?) http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/08/05/episode-15-etruscans-romans-and-a-modified-alphabet/

Episode 15: Etruscans, Romans and a Modified Alphabet

The first Indo-Europeans settle into Italy, but they encounter an existing civilization known as the Etruscans. The Etruscans borrow the alphabet from the Greeks, and soon pass it on to the Romans. Our modern alphabet finally begins to emerge.

Audio Player 00:00 - 37:35

Posted in alphabet, English, Etruscan, history, Latin, Roman, Uncategorized


Erstellt: 2018-01

I

J

K

krysstal.com
Borrowed Words From Etruscan

(E?)(L?) http://www.krysstal.com/display_borrowlang.php?lang=Etruscan

Etruscan is the extinct language of pre-Roman Italy. Very little is known about the language's origins.

These are some of the oldest borrowed words in English. Many of them came via Latin.

There are a number of calendar words, one planet and the name of Rome itself.


Erstellt: 2018-02

L

M

N

O

omniglot.com
Etruscan

(E?)(L?) http://www.omniglot.com/writing/etruscan.htm

Etruscan (mekh Rasnal)

The Etruscan language was spoken by the Etruscans in Etruria (Tuscany and Umbria) until about the 1st century AD. After which it continued to be studied by priests and scholars, and it was used in religious ceremonies until the early 5th century AD. The emperor Claudius (10 BC - 54 AD) wrote a history of the Etruscans in 20 volumes, however none of these volumes survive.

Etruscan was related to Raetic, a language once spoken in the Alps, and also to Lemnian, once spoken on the island of Lemnos. It was also possibly related to Camunic, a language once spoken in the northwest of Italy.

Etruscan alphabet

The Etruscan alphabet developed from a Western variety of the Greek alphabet brought to Italy by Euboean Greeks. The earliest known inscription dates from the middle of the 6th century BC. Most Etruscan inscriptions are written in horizontal lines from right to left, but some are boustrophedon (running alternately left to right then right to left).

More than 10,000 Etruscan inscriptions have been found on tombstones, vases, statues, mirrors and jewellery. Fragments of an Etruscan book made of linen have also been found. Etruscan texts can be read: i.e. the pronunciation of the letters is known, though scholars are not sure what all the words mean.

No major literary works in Etruscan have survived, however there is evidence for the existence of religious and historical literature and drama. It is also possible that the Etruscans had a notation system for music.
...


Erstellt: 2018-02

P

portentous (W3)

Engl. "portentous" = dt. "ominös", "unheilvoll", "verhängnisvoll", "ungeheuer", "wunderbar", "unheimlich" geht zurück auf lat. "portentum" = dt. "ankündigen", "vorhersagen", "prophezeien", "sich ankündigen", "bevorstehen", "sich zeigen", "grauenhaftes Vorzeichen", "Missgeburt", "Scheusal", "Ungeheuer", "fantastisches Gebilde", "Wundermärchen".

Man vermutet, dass die Römer lat. "portentum" von den Etruskern geerbt haben.

(E?)(L?) https://www.dailywritingtips.com/prophetic-predictive-presageful-and-portentous/

"Prophetic", "Predictive", "Presageful", and "Portentous"

By Maeve Maddox

In a very general sense, the words are synonymous. All four are adjectives indicative of the future. Their connotations, however, differ.
...
Here are a few synonyms for "portentous":


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/wordoftheday/2000/05/06/portentous

"portentous": foreboding; ominous.


(E?)(L?) https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/portentous-2017-09-17

...
Did You Know?

At the heart of "portentous" is "portent", a word for an omen or sign, which comes to us from the Latin noun "portentum" of the same meaning. And indeed, the first uses of "portentous" did refer to "omens". The second sense of "portentous", describing that which is extremely impressive, developed in the 16th century. A third definition — "grave", "solemn", "significant" — was then added to the second edition of Webster's New International Dictionary in 1934. The word's connotations, however, have since moved into less estimable territory. It now frequently describes both the "pompous" and the "excessive".
...


(E?)(L?) https://owad.de/check.php4?id=3811
(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=3811

...
"Portentous" is a 16th century word from the Latin "portentosus" ("monstrous", "marvellous", "threatening"), which in turn stems from "portentem". The root of "portentem" - "portent" - is from "portend", meaning to "foretell", "reveal", "point out" or "indicate" (originally "to stretch forward"). "Portentous" thus refers to something that has major significance or importance, especially for the future.
...
The adjective "portentous" is used with three meanings: ...


(E?)(L?) https://www.thoughtco.com/portentous-and-pretentious-1689465

The Difference Between "Portentous" and "Pretentious"

Commonly Confused Words

by Richard Nordquist

Updated April 08, 2017

The adjective "portentous" means "ominous" or "momentous", referring to a sign or prediction that something important is about to happen. "Portentous" can also mean "pompous" or "self-important". (This second meaning overlaps with that of "pretentious".)

The adjective "pretentious" means "full of pretense", "making excessive or unwarranted claims to be important or sophisticated".

Notice how these two words are spelled: "portentous" ends in "-tous"; "pretentious" ends in "-tious".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/

"portentous": of momentous or ominous significance

"portentously": in a portentous manner


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/portentous

portentous


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/portentously

portentously


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/portentousness

portentousness


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/portents

portents


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=portentous
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "portentous" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1590 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#portentous

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2018-01

Q

R

S

satellite (W3)

Dt. "Satellit", engl. "satellite", frz "satellite", geht zurück auf lat. "satelles" = dt. "Leibwächter", "Gefolge", "Garde", "Begleiter", "Diener", aber auch pejor. "Helfershelfer", "Spießgeselle". Der Ursprung könnte etrusk. "satnal" sein.

Im 16. Jh. erschien engl. "satellite" mit der Bedeutung dt. "Leibgardist". Als Bezeichnung in der Astronomie findet man es ab dem 17. Jh. (coined by astronomer Johannes Kepler in 1611. English use is from 1665.) Als politische Bezeichnung für "Satellitenstaaten" findet man es ab dem 18. Jh.

Satellite-Words:

satellite.png satellite.png satellite1.png satellite1.png satellite2.png satellite2.png satellite3.png satellite3.png satellite7.png satellite7.png satellite8.png satellite8.png satellite11.pngsatellite11.png

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20120505232949/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Satellite

"SATELLITE" (from the Lat. "satelles", an "attendant"), in astronomy, a small opaque body revolving around a planet, as the moon around the earth (see Planet). In the theory of cubic curves, Arthur Cayley defined the satellite of a given line to be the line joining the three points in which tangents at the intersections of the given (primary) line and curve again meet the curve.


(E?)(L?) https://ia800301.us.archive.org/23/items/h00hugh/h00hugh_encrypted.pdf

"satellite". A person or, more recently, a nation in thrall to another person or nation.

"Cuba is not a satellite of the USSR in the same sense that other Latin American states are satellites of the USA" (M. B. Brown, The Economics of Imperialism, 1974).

The term is essentially demeaning, implying that the satellite has no will of his, her, or its own. The connotation nowadays is that of a satellite kept in its orbit by the gravitational force of a larger astronomical body. The personal sense of the word is the older, however. It derives from the Latin "satelles", an "attendant" or "bodyguard", which may in turn have come from the Etruscan "satnal".

It appears first in English in the sixteenth century referring to a yeoman of the guard. The astronomical sense has been dated to the seventeenth century and the political sense to the eighteenth. The transition seems to have been made by Thomas Paine in Common Sense. "In no instance hath nature made the satellite larger than its primary planet, and as England and America . . . reverse the common order of nature, it is evident that they belong to different systems: England to Europe, America to itself" (2/14/1776).

See also "IMPERIALIST", "LACKEY", and "PUPPET".


(E?)(L?) http://outils.biblissima.fr/fr/collatinus-web/

"satelles", itis, m. : "garde", "garde du corps", "compagnon", "serviteur", "complice"

"satelles", f. sing : "compagne"

"satellites", m. plur : "la garde", "l'escorte"


(E?)(L?) https://emojipedia.org/satellite/

Satellite

A satellite which orbits the earth, and is generally used for communications, weather, and GPS.

"Satellite" was approved as part of Unicode 7.0 in 2014 and added to Emoji 1.0 in 2015.


(E?)(L?) http://emojipedia.org/satellite-antenna/

Satellite Antenna


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=satellite

"satellite" (n.)

1540s, "follower or attendant of a superior person", from Middle French "satellite" (14c.), from Latin "satellitem" (nominative "satelles") "attendant", "companion", "courtier", "accomplice", "assistant", perhaps from Etruscan "satnal" (Klein), or a compound of roots "*satro-" "full", "enough" + "*leit-" "to go" (Tucker); compare English "follow", which is constructed of similar roots.

Meaning "planet that revolves about a larger one" first attested 1660s, in reference to the moons of Jupiter, from Latin "satellites", which was used in this sense 1610s by German astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630). Galileo, who had discovered them, called them "Sidera Medicæa" in honor of the Medici family. Meaning "man-made machinery orbiting the Earth" first recorded 1936 as theory, 1957 as fact. Meaning "country dependent and subservient to another" is recorded from 1800.


(E?)(L?) https://www.eumetsat.int/website/home/Satellites/index.html

Satellites


(E?)(L?) http://fishbase.org/glossary/Glossary.php?q=microsatellite

Definition of Term "microsatellite"

(english) A very short unit sequence of DNA (2 to 4 base pairs) that is repeated multiple times in tandem. "Microsatellites" are highly polymorphic and make ideal markers for analysis of relationships. (See also: "polymorphic")


(E?)(L?) http://fishbase.org/Glossary/Glossary.php?q=satellite&language=english&sc=is

Definition of Term "satellite"

(english) A small male fish which mimics a female and attempts to sneak a spawning opportunity by darting in on an adult spawning pair, e.g. in Lepomis gibbosus (Centrarchidae).


(E?)(L?) http://fishbase.org/glossary/Glossary.php?q=satellite+species

Definition of Term "satellite species"

(english) The condition found in Petromyzontidae where a non-parasitic species is believed to have evolved from most parasitic species, forming a series of species pairs.


(E?)(L?) http://fishbase.org/glossary/Glossary.php?q=satellites

Definition of Term "satellites"

(english) In genetics, secondary constrictions often associated with regions where the nucleolus is formed or attached (nucleolar organizer). (See also: "chromosome", "nuclear organizing region", "nucleus")

(french) En génétique : resserrements secondaires souvent associés avec les régions où le nucléole est formé ou est attaché (organisateur nucléonique). (See also: "chromosome", "nuclear organizing region", "nucleus")

(portuguese) Em genética, constrições secundárias frequentemente associadas a regiões onde o nucléolo é formado ou está aderente (organizador nucleolar). (See also: "chromosome", "nuclear organizing region", "nucleus")


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/communications%20satellite

communications satellite

Relay station in space for sending telephone, television, telex, and other messages around the world.

Messages are sent to and from the satellites via ground stations. Most communications satellites are in geostationary orbit, appearing to hang fixed over one point on the earth's surface.


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/galilean satellites

Galilean satellites

The four satellites of Jupiter first observed by Galileo Galilei; namely, Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/satellite

satellite

A moon or a man-made body in orbit around a planet.

For clarity, natural satellites are commonly described as "moons" to distinguish them from man-made or artificial satellites.


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/satellite power system

satellite power system; SPS

Concept for providing large amounts of electricity for use on the earth from one or more satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit.

A very large array of solar cells on each satellite would provide electricity, which would be converted to microwave energy and beamed to a receiving antenna on the ground. There, it would be reconverted into electricity and distributed the same as any other centrally generated power, through a grid.


(E?)(L?) nattybumppo.github.io/rocket-launch-history/

Biosatellite 2
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral, USA
Time: 1967 Sep 7 2204:26
Launch Vehicle: Thor Delta G
COSPAR ID: 1967-083A


Biosatellite 3
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral, USA
Time: 1969 Jun 29 0315:59
Launch Vehicle: Thor Delta N
COSPAR ID: 1969-056A


KT-1 satellite?
Launch Site: Taiyuan Space Center, China
Time: 2005 Jun 9 0000:00
Launch Vehicle: KT-1
COSPAR ID: 2005-F04



(E?)(L?) https://icesat-2.gsfc.nasa.gov/

ICESat: Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite


(E?)(L?) https://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/22/word-of-the-day-satellite/

Word of the Day | "satellite"

By The Learning Network January 22, 2013 12:02 am

January 22, 2013 12:02 am

"satellite", noun and adjective The word satellite has appeared in 1,951 New York Times articles in the past year, including on Dec. 24 in “Elite Boarding Schools Spreading Through Asia” by Kristiano Ang and Yenni Kwok:
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735691.timeline.0001

1957: The USSR launches Sputnik, the world's first artificial satellite


(E?)(L?) http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735707.timeline.0001

1965: The first communications satellite, Early Bird, is launched from Cape Canaveral


(E?)(L?) http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735714.timeline.0001

1973: Elvis Presley performs in Honolulu in the Aloha Concert, the first programme to be broadcast live round the world by satellite


(E?)(L?) http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735721.timeline.0001

1989: Rupert Murdoch launches Sky, a satellite television channel, in the UK


(E?)(L?) http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735745.timeline.0001

2007: China carries out a successful test of a ground-based missile that can destroy satellites in orbit

2009: Iran launches a satellite into orbit on an Iranian-built rocket


(E?)(L?) http://solarviews.com/eng/terms.htm

"satellite": A body that revolves around a larger body.


(E?)(L?) http://www.terrapattern.com/

TERRAPATTERN

This is the alpha version of "Terrapattern", a visual search tool for satellite imagery. The project provides journalists, citizen scientists, and other researchers with the ability to quickly scan large geographical regions for specific visual features.

Pittsburgh | San Francisco | New York City | Detroit | Berlin | Miami | Austin | More Cities Coming Soon!


(E?)(L?) https://www.theguardian.com/environment/series/satelliteeye

Satellite eye on Earth


(E?)(L?) https://www.theguardian.com/science/satellites

Satellites


(E?)(L?) http://www.vibrationdata.com/SpaceRace.htm

Sputnik

During 1957 to 1958, the Soviet Union and the United States held an International Geophysics Year to promote the study and understanding of the Earth. The Soviets responded by launching the "Sputnik 1" satellite on October 4, 1957. This was the first artificial satellite ever launched. The satellite, a steel sphere, weighed 184 pounds, was 23 inches in diameter. It sent out a "beep-beep" radio signal through its four antennas scientists and ham radio operators throughout the world could hear. The signal continued until the transmitter batteries ran out on October 26, 1957.
...
The Soviet Union went on to launch a series of Sputnik satellites. "Sputnik 2" carried a dog named Laika into space.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.visualthesaurus.com/

"satellite"

Today's noun is all space-agey and technical, so it's a bit ironic that its earliest job in English was to label an obsequious underling. The word is from a Latin word for "servant" or "attendant". Persons of great import had many of these, and the analogy was soon made to large heavenly bodies that had smaller ones orbiting them. From there, it was only a short step to the manufactured orbiters that we know today.


(E?)(L?) http://www.visualthesaurus.com?word=satellite

satellite


(E?)(L?) https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/C/communications_satellite.html

communications satellite


(E?)(L?) https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/D/digital_satellite_system.html

digital satellite system


(E?)(L?) https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/D/direct_broadcasting_satellite.html

direct broadcasting satellite


(E?)(L?) https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/F/fixed_service_satellite.html

fixed service satellite

Abbreviated as "FSS", a "fixed service satellite" is a type of satellite used for services such as telephone calls, and television signals for broadcasting. Fixed service satellite generally have a low power output and larger dish-style antennas are required for reception. Fixed service satellites have less power than "direct broadcasting satellites" ("DBS").

(2) A general term often used to refer to any communications satellite.


(E?)(L?) https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/G/geosynchronous_satellite.html

geosynchronous satellite

Also called "geostationary", or simply "GEO", it refers to the movement of communications satellites where the satellite circles the globe over the equator, in a movement that is synchronized with the earth's rotation. Because of this synchronization, the satellite appears to be stationary, and they also offer continuous operation in the area of visibility.


(E?)(L?) https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/I/Inmarsat_4_satellite.html

Inmarsat-4 satellite


(E?)(L?) https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/I/IoS.html

"IoS" is a term that can refer to either "Internet over Satellite" or Apple's iOS mobile operating system.

In the former case, "Internet over Satellite" ("IoS") technology allows a user to access the Internet via a satellite that orbits the earth. A satellite is placed at a static point above the earth's surface. The satellite in a fixed position, also referred to as geostationary or geosynchronous, is able to maintain a reliable connection to the antennas on the earth because the satellite orbits the earth at the exact speed of the earth's rotation.

Because of the enormous distances signals must travel from the earth up to the satellite and back again, "IoS" is slightly slower than high-speed terrestrial connections over copper or fiber optic cables. In remote regions of the world, "Internet over Satellite" is the only viable option as installing the cable backbone necessary for Internet connection is not economically feasible or physically possible.


(E?)(L?) http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/S/satellite_broadband.html

satellite broadband


(E?)(L?) http://www.webopedia.com/Mobile_Computing/Wirelsess_Computing/Satellite_Communications/

Satellite Communications


(E?)(L?) http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/s/satellite_radio.html

satellite radio


(E?)(L?) http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/S/Sirius_Satellite_Radio.html

Sirius Satellite Radio


(E?)(L?) http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/X/XM_Satellite_Radio.html

XM Satellite Radio


(E?)(L?) http://www.wolframalpha.com/examples/science-and-technology/technological-world/

Satellites


(E?)(L?) http://www.wolframalpha.com/examples/science-and-technology/astronomy/satellites/

Satellites

Get information about a satellite: Compare satellites: Find out where a specific satellite is right now: Properties of Satellites

Get a property of a satellite: Do computations with satellite properties: Visible Satellites

Get data on satellites visible from your location: Get data on satellites visible from a specified location:


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/more/899/

"Satellite", n., an object that revolves around another, larger one. From the Latin "satellitem", "attendant" or "guard". This sense coined by astronomer Johannes Kepler in 1611. English use is from 1665.


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=satellite
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "satellite" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1630 / 1800 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#satellite

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2018-01

scurrilous
skurril (W3)

Engl. "scurrilous" hat den Bedeutungsumfang dt. "beleidigend", "derb (Witz etc)", "ehrenrührig", "frech", "gemein", "niederträchtig", "ordinär-scherzhaft", "unflätig", "verleumderisch", "zotig". Engl. "scurrilous" geht über mfrz. "scurrile" zurück auf lat. "scurrilis" = dt. "clownartig", lat. "scurra" = dt. "Possenreißer", "Gaukler", "Narr", "Lebemann". Für lat. "scurrilis" wird seinerseits eine etruskische Herkunft vermutet.

Auch dt. "skurril" (17. Jh.) = dt. "absonderlich anmutend", "sonderbar", "auf lächerliche oder befremdende Weise eigenwillig" wird auf lat. "scurrilis", "scurra" = dt. "Witzbold", "Spaßmacher", zurück geführt.

In der Wortfamilie von engl. "scurrilous" findet man auch engl. "scurrile" = dt. "unflätig", "zotig", engl. "scurrility" = dt. "zotige Scherzhaftigkeit", engl. "scurrilely" = dt. "unflätig", "zotig", engl. "scurrilize" = dt. "", engl. "scurrilously" = dt. "verleumderisch", "unflätig", "zotig", engl. "scurrilousness" = dt. "Unflätigkeit".


Lexicographer Samuel Johnson defined scurrilous as "using such language as only the licence of a buffoon could warrant." Qualities traditionally associated with buffoonery—vulgarity, irreverence, and indecorousness—are qualities often invoked by the word scurrilous. Unlike the words of a jester, however, "scurrilous" language of the present day more often intends to seriously harm or slander than to produce a few laughs.


(E?)(L?) https://ia800301.us.archive.org/23/items/h00hugh/h00hugh_encrypted.pdf

"scurrilous". "Vile", "low", "mean", "abusive".

Thus, President Ronald Reagan's first attorney general, William French Smith, hit the ceiling after it was reported that he had attended the birthday party of a man whose other friends happened to include mobsters. As reported in The Washington Post. "He labeled news reports questioning the propriety of his appearance at the party as 'nothing less than scurrilous,' repeating "scurrilous" three times, until he finally added, 'Am I making myself clear?' " (William Safire, What's the Good Word?, 1982).

The word's meaning seems to be in the process of changing. It formerly referred to — and some dictionaries still give as its primary meaning — the use of coarse, indecent, foul-mouthed language, i.e., the sort of talk that only a professional fool or buffoon could get away with. This is reflected in its etymology. It comes from the Latin "scurrilis", "buffoonlike", "scurra", "buffoon", and possibly an older Etruscan term.

See also "FOOL"


(E?)(L?) https://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2006/02/01
(E?)(L?) https://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2006/10/29
(E?)(L?) https://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2010/08/07
(E?)(L?) https://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/scurrilous

"scurrilous"

Part of Speech: Adjective

Meaning: ...
Word History: Today's Good Word is an extension of its ancestor, "scurrile", with the suffix "-ous". "Scurrile" has the same meaning as "scurrilous" and came to French from Latin "scurrilis" "jeering", "buffoonish", the adjective of the noun "scurra" "buffoon". "Scurra" was borrowed from Etruscan, a language spoken in Italy before the arrival of the Romans. We only have only a few short phrases from this language on pottery shards, lintels, and the like, so little is known about it.


(E?)(L?) http://scurrilize.ascii.uk/

SCURRILIZE - ASCII ART


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/scurrilous

"scurrilous"

adjective First recorded in 1570-80; scurrile + -ous
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.etymonline.com/word/scurrilous

"scurrilous" (adj.)

"using such language as only the licence of a buffoon can warrant" [Johnson], 1570s, from "scurrile" "coarsely joking" (c. 1500, implied in "scurrility"), from Latin "scurrilis" "buffoonlike", from "scurra" "fashionable city idler", "man-about-town", later "buffoon". According to Klein's sources, "an Etruscan loan-word".

Related: "Scurrilously"; "scurrilousness".

Related Entries: "scurrility"


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2010-September/subject.html

•"scald miserable" (scurrilous compound adjective), 1741 Joel S. Berson


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2006-September/subject.html

•"scurrilous" = "wicked" Jonathan Lighter


(E?)(L?) http://www.onelook.com/?w=scurrilous&loc=wotd

32 matching dictionaries


(E?)(L?) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scurrilous

Definition of scurrilous


(E?)(L?) http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/

scurrilous (1)


(E?)(L?) http://www.shakespeareswords.com/Glossary?let=s

scurrilous


(E?)(L?) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/
(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/portlets/wod/?y=2014&m=04&d=1&mode=m

Friday, April 4th

"scurrilous"

Today's adjective doesn't have anything to do with scurrying, despite appearances; the words are separately derived. Scurrilous, ultimately from a Latin root meaning "buffoon," means obscenely abusive or slanderous. Favorite followers of the adjective are attack, rumor, allegation, and accusation. It's a word much beloved by soft journalists, such as those specializing in the comings and goings of celebrities.


(E?)(L?) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/?word=scurrilous

"scurrilous"


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/




(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/1294

scurrilous


(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-sca1.htm

Scallywag or Scalawag

The word — very variably spelled — appeared first in the US. It was applied to undersized or ill-formed cattle, or to some disreputable person. After the Civil War, it became a term of abuse specifically aimed at those white Southerners who were prepared to accept the measures imposed during Reconstruction, often because they would profit from them. It shifted a little later to mean any politician who was corrupt or an intriguer. It has softened since, being a term these days of only mild reproach for a scamp, rascal or minor rogue, often combined with the gentle admiration that doting mothers dispose on an amusingly mischievous child.

Where it comes from is a matter of some dispute, though the Scots tongue seems to be an intermediary. Some authorities point to the Scots' word "scoloc", the name given to the first-born son of a tenant of a monastery who was given to the church to receive an ecclesiastical education. Later, the word could refer to any monastic tenant, and got turned into "scallag" for a farm servant or rustic person, also latterly a way of addressing a boy. And there's also the word "scurryvaig" for a "vagabond", "lout" or "slattern", which might be an influence, if not the source. Either way, it looks as though Latin is involved, since "scoloc" is really the same word as "scholar" (from Latin "schola") and "scurryvaig" may have originated in Latin "scurra vagus", a "wandering fool" ("scurra" is also the source of our "scurrilous").

Its abbreviation, "scally", is widely known in the north-west of England, especially around Liverpool, for a roguish self-assured young person — typically male — who is boisterous, disruptive, or irresponsible.


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/worldwidewords/2002-April/000174.html

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4. Weird Words: "Scallywag" or "Scalawag"

A scamp, rascal, or rogue; an amusingly mischievous child.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=scurrilous
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "scurrilous" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1580 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#scurrilous

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2018-01

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tripod.com
Etruscan Glossary

(E?)(L?) http://etruscans1.tripod.com/Language/

Compilation and translations from French, Italian and Latin

by Rick Mc Callister and Silvia Mc Callister-Castillo ©1999


Erstellt: 2018-02

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unesco.org
Etruscan Necropolises of Cerveteri and Tarquinia

(E?)(L?) http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1158

These two large Etruscan cemeteries reflect different types of burial practices from the 9th to the 1st century BC, and bear witness to the achievements of Etruscan culture. Which over nine centuries developed the earliest urban civilization in the northern Mediterranean. Some of the tombs are monumental, cut in rock and topped by impressive tumuli (burial mounds). Many feature carvings on their walls, others have wall paintings of outstanding quality. The necropolis near Cerveteri, known as Banditaccia, contains thousands of tombs organized in a city-like plan, with streets, small squares and neighbourhoods. The site contains very different types of tombs: trenches cut in rock; tumuli; and some, also carved in rock, in the shape of huts or houses with a wealth of structural details. These provide the only surviving evidence of Etruscan residential architecture. The necropolis of Tarquinia, also known as Monterozzi, contains 6,000 graves cut in the rock. It is famous for its 200 painted tombs, the earliest of which date from the 7th century BC.
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(E?)(L?) https://www.worldheritagesite.org/list/Etruscan+Necropolises

The Etruscan Necropolises of Cerveteri and Tarquinia bear witness to the achievements of Etruscan culture.

The necropolises of Tarquinia have some 6,000 tombs, 60 of which include wall paintings.

The most famous attraction of Cerveteri is the Necropoli della Banditaccia, encompassing a total of 1,000 tombs often housed in characteristic mounds. It is the largest ancient necropolis in the Mediterranean area.
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wikipedia.org
Etruscan civilization

(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etruscan_civilization

Etruscan civilization

The Etruscan civilization is the modern name given to a powerful and wealthy civilization of ancient Italy in the area corresponding roughly to Tuscany, western Umbria and northern Lazio. As distinguished by its unique language, this civilization endured from before the time of the earliest Etruscan inscriptions (c. 700 BC) until its assimilation into the Roman Republic, beginning in the late 4th century BC with the Roman–Etruscan Wars.

Culture that is identifiably Etruscan developed in Italy after about 800 BC, approximately over the range of the preceding Iron Age Villanovan culture. The latter gave way in the 7th century BC to a culture that was influenced by Ancient Greek culture. At its maximum extent, during the foundational period of Rome and the Roman Kingdom, Etruscan civilization flourished in three confederacies of cities: of Etruria, of the Po Valley with the eastern Alps and of Latium and Campania. The decline was gradual, but by 500 BC the political destiny of Italy had passed out of Etruscan hands.[4] The last Etruscan cities were formally absorbed by Rome around 100 BC.

Although the Etruscans developed a system of writing, the Etruscan language remains only partly understood, and only a handful of texts of any length survive, making modern understanding of their society and culture heavily dependent on much later and generally disapproving Roman sources. Politics was based on the small city and probably the family unit. In their heyday, the Etruscan elite grew very rich through trade with the Celtic world to the north and the Greeks to the south and filled their large family tombs with imported luxuries. Archaic Greece had a huge influence on their art and architecture, and Greek mythology was evidently very familiar to them.
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Origins - Etruscan origins

The ancient Romans referred to the "Etruscans" as the "Tusci" or "Etrusci". Their Roman name is the origin of the terms "Tuscany", which refers to their heartland, and "Etruria", which can refer to their wider region. In Attic Greek, the "Etruscans" were known as "Tyrrhenians" ("Turrhenoi", earlier "Tursenoi"), from which the Romans derived the names "Tyrrheni", "Tyrrhenia" ("Etruria"), and "Mare Tyrrhenum" ("Tyrrhenian Sea"), prompting some to associate them with the "Teresh" (Sea Peoples). The word may also be related to the Hittite "Taruisa". The "Etruscans" called themselves "Rasenna", which was syncopated to "Rasna".

The origins of the "Etruscans" are mostly lost in prehistory, although Greek historians as early as the 5th century BC repeatedly associated the "Tyrrhenians" ("Turrhenoi", "Tursenoi") with "Pelasgians". Thucydides, Herodotus and Strabo all denote Lemnos as settled by "Pelasgians" whom Thucydides identifies as "belonging to the Tyrrhenians", and although both Strabo and Herodotus agree that "Tyrrhenus" / "Tyrsenos", son of Atys, king of Lydia, led the migration, Strabo specifies that it was the "Pelasgians" of Lemnos and Imbros who followed "Tyrrhenus" / "Tyrsenos" to the Italian Peninsula. The Lemnian-Pelasgian link was further manifested by the discovery of the Lemnos Stele, whose inscriptions were written in a language which shows strong structural resemblances to the language of the "Tyrrhenians" ("Etruscans"). Dionysius of Halicarnassus records a Pelasgian migration from Thessaly to the Italian peninsula, noting that "the Pelasgi made themselves masters of some of the lands belonging to the Umbri"; Herodotus describes how the Tyrrheni migrated from Lydia to the lands of the Umbri.

Strabo as well as the Homeric Hymn to Dionysus make mention of the Tyrrhenians as pirates. Pliny the Elder put the Etruscans in the context of the Rhaetian people to the north and wrote in his Natural History (AD 79):

Adjoining these the (Alpine) "Noricans" are the "Raeti" and "Vindelici". All are divided into a number of states. The "Raeti" are believed to be people of "Tuscan" race driven out by the "Gauls", their leader was named "Raetus".
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Erstellt: 2018-02

wikipedia.org
Etruscan language

(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etruscan_language

The Etruscan language was the spoken and written language of the Etruscan civilization, in Italy, in the ancient region of "Etruria" (modern "Tuscany" plus western Umbria and northern Latium) and in parts of Corsica, Campania, Veneto, Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna. "Etruscan" influenced Latin, but was eventually completely superseded by it. The Etruscans left around 13,000 inscriptions which have been found so far, only a small minority of which are of significant length, some bilingual inscriptions with texts also in Latin, Greek or Phoenician, and a few dozen loanwords, such as the name "Roma" (from Etruscan "Ruma") but Etruscan's influence was significant. Attested from 700 BC to AD 50, the relation of Etruscan to other languages has been a source of long-running speculation and study, with it being referred to at times as an isolate, one of the Tyrsenian languages, and a number of other less well-known possibilities.
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Erstellt: 2018-02

wikipedia.org
List of English words of Etruscan origin

(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Etruscan_origin

This is a list of English words that may be of Etruscan origin, and were borrowed through Latin, often via French. The Etruscan origin of most of these words is disputed, and some may be of Indo-European or other origin. The question is made more complex by the fact that the Etruscans borrowed many Greek words in modified form. Typically if a Latin word has an unknown, uncertain or disputed origin, it is considered a possible candidate for deriving in whole or in part from an Etruscan word; however, native Etruscan must then be distinguished from Greek. If no Etruscan word is clearly identifiable sometimes an attempt is made to reconstruct one. Etruscan derivations therefore are highly variable in probability; that is, some are highly speculative and others more likely.

Contents

List This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.
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Erstellt: 2018-01

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Etruskologie, Etruscología, Étruscologie, Etruscologia, Etruscology

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Camporeale, Giovannangelo
The Etruscans Outside Etruria

(E?)(L?) http://www.sehepunkte.net/2006/03/7719.html

Giovannangelo Camporeale (ed.): The Etruscans Outside Etruria

Translated by Thomas Michael Hartmann, Los Angeles: Getty Publications 2004

Rezensiert von Magdalene Söldner


Erstellt: 2018-02

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